2013 - 2014
Undergraduate Catalogue

Interdisciplinary Studies

MINOR IN AFRICAN AND AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES

Contact: Brian Norman, Associate Professor of English

Office: Humanities Center, Room 242H

Telephone: 410-617-2413

e-mail: bjnorman@loyola.edu

Website: www.loyola.edu/academic/aaas

The Minor in African and African American Studies (AAAS) offers opportunities for critical examination and sophisticated understanding of the cultural, social, political, economic, and historical factors that have created and shaped Africa and its diaspora, including black experiences in the United States, the Caribbean, and throughout the globe. The minor consists of six, three-credit courses, some of which may require prior approval of the program director, and a portfolio submission. Credits toward the minor must come from at least three distinct disciplines; at least four courses must be at the 300-level or above; and up to two courses may be cross-counted between the AAAS minor and another major or minor. Some courses are more applicable or available to certain majors than others.

Requirements for the minor are as follows:

  • One African Studies Elective
  • Two African American Studies Electives
  • Three African, African American, African Diaspora, and/or Comparative Racial Studies Electives, including any combination of courses from the electives listed below; courses approved for AAAS elective credit for a particular semester; study abroad courses approved for AAAS elective credit (prior approval required); a senior seminar, capstone, or internship course in the studentís major that significantly engages AAAS topics (prior approval required).
  • A portfolio of representative work in the minor, submitted to program director in the final year.

An international, service-learning, or internship course is recommended. Study-abroad courses must be in Africa or in a black-majority location in the diaspora (e.g., Guadeloupe); up to three study-abroad courses can count toward the AAAS minor, in consultation with the Department accepting the credit. Service-learning is integral to courses designated as such, which entails working with African American or African diaspora populations in the greater Baltimore area. Internship courses are offered through a studentís major and it is the studentís responsibility to seek program director approval for AAAS credit. Students may also take up to two courses offered through the Baltimore Student Exchange Program at other area colleges and universities; however, these courses must be preapproved by the program director.

Students should work with the program director, in addition to their major advisor, to devise a coherent program of study. Meeting once per semester with the director is suggested. Students are required to work with the program director to compile and submit a final portfolio of a representative selection of work from various AAAS classes, ordinarily in the final year of coursework in the minor.

Electives

African Studies
  • AH202 African Art
  • FR376 Outsiders in Sub-Saharan Francophone Literature
  • HS308 White Manís Burden: Colonialism and the Historical Origins of Racism
  • HS373 Africa: Past and Present
  • HS388 Conquest and Colonization in Africa: 1884-1965
  • HS389 Women and Social Change in Modern Africa
  • HS443 Apartheid and Its Demise in South Africa
  • HS480 Seminar: Cold War in Southern Africa
  • ML270 Introduction to African Literature
African American Studies
  • AH207 African American Art
  • CM374 Documentary Production: Baltimore Stories
  • EN373 African American Literature
  • EN378 Race and Ethnicity in American Literature
  • HS358 African American History through the Civil War
  • HS359 African American History through Film
  • HS360 African American History Since Emancipation
  • HS366 The Civil Rights Crusade
  • HS428 The Making of the Early Republic: A Study of Race, Place, and Ideology
  • PL399 Anthropology of Slavery
  • PS389 African American Political Thought
  • TH262 African American Religious Thought
African Diaspora and Comparative Racial Studies
  • FR205 Living and Working in the French Caribbean Today
  • FR304 Culture and Civilization IV: Introduction to Francophone Cultures
  • FR305 Living and Working in the French Caribbean Today
  • FR330 Introduction to Francophone Literature
  • FR375 Womenís Voices in the Francophone World
  • HS367 Black Women in the Atlantic World
  • HS406 Transatlantic Slave Sites: Study Tour
  • HS424 Race, Place, and Memory in American History
  • HS461 Seminar: The African Diaspora
  • ML363 Voices Across America: A Symphony of Thought
  • SC105 Education in U.S. Society
  • SC365 Neighborhood and Community in Urban America
  • SC421 Seminar: Race, Class, Gender, Sexuality
  • SC471 Minority Group Conflict

AAAS Approval Required: The electives listed below may count toward AAAS credit if the final paper or project significantly engages African, African American, or African diaspora studies. The student must seek approval in advance from the program director, and it is the studentís responsibility to work with the course instructor to ensure that the final paper or project is on AAAS topics. Other courses may be approved for credit toward the AAAS minor if they significantly engage AAAS learning aims.

  • AH204 Islamic Art
  • CM330 Stereotypes in U.S. Film and Television
  • CM347 The Documentary Tradition
  • CM366 Reporting on Urban Affairs
  • EC348 Development Economics
  • EN367 Topics in American Literature
  • EN376 Postcolonial Literature
  • EN384 Topics in Postcolonial Literature
  • EN385 Seminar in Postcolonial Literature
  • EN388 Seminar in Multiethnic American Literature
  • HS345 The Peoples of Early America
  • HS348 The Civil War and Reconstruction
  • HS361 Merchants and Farmers, Planters and Slaves: The Roots of American Business, 1600-1850
  • HS463 Seminar: Colonial British America
  • LW409 Special Topics in Law and Social Responsibility
  • MK346 Consumer Behavior
  • PS351 Third World Politics
  • PY253 Multicultural Issues in Psychology
  • SC207 Protest: Legacy of the Sixties
  • SC221 Sociology of Race, Class, and Gender
  • SC361 Social Inequality
  • SC362 Global Inequality
  • SN306 Literature and Identity Politics in Peru
  • SN370 Nineteenth-Century Latin American Novel
  • SP312 Cultural Diversity in Communication

MINOR IN AMERICAN STUDIES

Contacts: Jean Lee Cole, Associate Professor of English; Douglas Harris, Assistant Professor of Political Science

Office: Humanities Center, Room 230; Beatty Hall, Room 306h

Telephone: 410-617-5440; 410-617-2227

Website: www.loyola.edu/americanstudies

American studies is an interdisciplinary field of study that examines the American experience--past and present--through the literature, art, history, politics, and society of the United States. Requirements for the minor are as follows:

  • EN203 Major Writers: American Literature or
  • EN366 American Literature to the First World War
  • HS340 American through Reconstruction or
  • HS341 The United States Since the Civil War
  • Capstone Project in American Studies (AH490/EN405/HS490/PS490)
  • Three Electives (9 credits; listed below)

No more than two courses from the same department may count toward the minor. At least three of courses counted toward the minor must be taken at the 300- or 400-level.

Electives

  • AH207 African American Art
  • AH318 American Art: Art for a Democracy
  • AH349 Baltimore: Its History and Architecture
  • AH351 American Urban Culture: A Tale of Four Cities
  • CM302 Free Speech, Free Expression
  • CM305 Media and the Political Process
  • CM306 Popular Culture in America
  • CM342 Media, Culture, and Society
  • CM360 Literary Journalism
  • DR210 American Musical Theatre: Uptown and Downtown
  • DR279 Silent Cinema
  • DR280 Classic Hollywood Film
  • EC310 American Economic History
  • EN367 Topics in American Literature
  • EN369 The Novel in America
  • EN378 Race and Ethnicity in American Literature
  • EN379 Gender in American Literature
  • EN388 Seminar in Multiethnic American Literature
  • EN397 Seminar in American Literature
  • HN420 American Political Development
  • HS343 American Environmental History
  • HS344 American Women's History
  • HS345 The Peoples of Early America
  • HS346 Revolutionary America
  • HS348 The Civil War and Reconstruction
  • HS349 Baltimore: Its History and Architecture
  • HS350 World War II in America
  • HS351 American Urban Culture: A Tale of Four Cities
  • HS352 America Since 1945
  • HS353 History of Violence in America
  • HS356 American Art: Art for a Democracy
  • HS358 African American History through the Civil War
  • HS359 African American History through Film
  • HS360 African American History Since Emancipation
  • HS361 Merchants and Farmers, Planters and Slaves: The Roots of American Business, 1600-1850
  • HS362 Industrial and Big Business Economy
  • HS363 A Century of Diplomacy: U.S. Foreign Policy Since 1890
  • HS366 The Civil Rights Crusade
  • HS367 Black Women in the Atlantic World
  • HS368 The Atlantic World: Readings, Approaches, and Explorations
  • HS372 The Vietnam War through Film and Literature
  • HS406 Transatlantic Slave Sites: Study Tour
  • HS423 Disasters in American History
  • HS424 Race, Place, and Memory in American History
  • HS425 Modern American Social Movements
  • HS426 Propaganda, Culture, and American Society: 1780-1830
  • HS427 The Era of Good Stealings? Gilded Age America, 1865-1900
  • HS428 The Making of the Early Republic: A Study of Race, Place, and Ideology
  • HS460 Seminar: American Progressivism
  • HS462 Seminar: Taking Care of Business: The Evolution of American Business Leadership, 1600-1990s
  • HS463 Seminar: Colonial British America
  • IT202 The Living Language
  • ML362 The Early Latino Experience in the United States
  • ML363 Voices Across America: A Symphony of Thought
  • ML441 Modern Hispanic American Fiction
  • MU210 American Musical Theatre: Uptown and Downtown
  • PL390 American Philosophy
  • PS102 American Politics
  • PS314 Public Opinion and American Democracy
  • PS315 American Political Development
  • PS316 American Political Parties
  • PS318 Media and Politics
  • PS319 Interest Groups in American Democracy
  • PS321 Religion and Politics in America
  • PS325 Introduction to Public Policy
  • PS326 Congress: The Legislative Process
  • PS327 Congressional Politics
  • PS329 The Modern American Presidency
  • PS330 Strategic Intelligence and American Democracy
  • PS341 Constitutional Law: Power in the National System
  • PS342 Equal Protection Law
  • PS343 Crime, the Individual, and Society
  • PS344 Civil Liberties I
  • PS345 Civil Liberties II
  • PS359 Approaches to American Foreign Policy
  • PS384 American Political Thought
  • PS389 African American Political Thought
  • PS410 Seminar: Modern Constitutional Theory
  • PS420 Seminar: American Political Development
  • PS470 Seminar: Toqueville
  • PS476 Intelligence, Secrecy, and Governmental Reform
  • PS477 Intelligence and the Executive Branch
  • PT279 Silent Cinema
  • PT280 Classic Hollywood Film
  • SC103 American Society
  • SC204 The Family
  • SC205 Social Problems
  • SC207 Protest: Legacy of the Sixties
  • SC331 Deviance and Social Control
  • SC332 The Sociology of Crime and Criminals
  • SC333 Juvenile Delinquency
  • SC361 Social Inequality
  • SC365 Neighborhood and Community in Urban America
  • SC367 Criminal Justice
  • SC471 Minority Group Conflict
  • TH220 The Catholic Church in the United States
  • TH262 African American Religious Thought
  • TH316 Ethics: Catholic Spiritual Life in the United States
  • TH336 Catholic Intellectual Life in the United States: Two Hundred Years of American Catholic Opinion
  • TH381 Faith and Film: The Apostle's Creed in the American Cinema
  • WR350 Art of Prose: Selected Authors
  • WR351 Art of the Essay: Women Writers
  • WR354 Writing about the Environment
AMS Committee Approval Required:
  • AH402 Special Topics in Art History
  • DR362 Special Topics in Dramatic History/Literature
  • EN365 Seminar in Literature and Catholicism (Post-1800)
  • EN368 Critical Methodologies (Post-1800): Special Topics
  • EN371 Contemporary Literature
  • EN377 Topics in Twentieth-Century Literature
  • EN382 Topics in Literature and Film Studies
  • EN383 Seminar in Modern Literature
  • EN386 Seminar in Literature and Film (Post-1800)
  • EN387 Seminar in Contemporary Literature
  • EN389 Seminar in Literature and Gender
  • EN399 Seminar in Literary Topics After 1800
  • EN409 Senior Honors Seminar
  • MU306 World Music: Common Ground, Separate Ground
  • WR320 Art of the Argument
  • WR352 Biography and Autobiography
  • WR353 The Contemporary Essay
  • WR358 Literary Reviewing
  • WR385 Special Topics in Creative Writing
  • WR400 Senior Seminar

MINOR IN ASIAN STUDIES

Contact: R. Keith Schoppa, Professor of History, Doehler Chair in Asian History

Office: Humanities Center, Room 315

Telephone: 410-617-2893

This joint program with Notre Dame of Maryland University allows students in any major to declare a minor devoted to Asian studies. In the Asian studies minor, students learn how different disciplines bring their methodologies to bear on the study of Asia. One by-product is a better understanding of the West itself.

Requirements for the minor (18 credits) consist of five electives plus a final seminar (HS482, HS483, or HS484) or an independent study. The following restrictions apply:

  • no more than two courses may be counted from one discipline (e.g., history, political science);
  • no more than two courses may be counted in language;
  • no more than three courses from any department containing more than one discipline may be counted toward the minor;
  • no more than three courses from a study abroad program may be counted toward the minor.

In their final semester, students research, write, and present papers designed to integrate their work on Asia. The seminar alternates between Notre Dame and Loyola, and the content varies according to the interests of the instructor and the participants. In order to accommodate individual interests or scheduling needs, a student may be allowed to choose an independent study instead of the seminar. Please confer with the coordinator for additional information.

The following courses at Loyola and Notre Dame, as well as Japanese and Chinese language courses at Johns Hopkins University count toward the minor:

Loyola Electives

  • AH203 The Arts of East Asia
  • AH204 Islamic Art
  • BH282 International Business
  • CI101 Chinese I
  • CI102 Chinese II
  • CI103 Chinese III
  • CI104 Chinese IV
  • CI201 Chinese Composition and Conversation
  • CI202 Advanced Chinese Composition and Conversation
  • CI303 Selected Readings in Modern Chinese I
  • CI304 Selected Readings in Modern Chinese II
  • HS370 The Jesuits in Asia Since 1542
  • HS371 East Asia in the Modern World
  • HS372 The Vietnam War through Film and Literature
  • HS374 East Asia on Film
  • HS375 Indian History, Culture, and Religion through Film
  • HS377 History of Modern China
  • HS378 History of Modern Japan
  • HS380 History of South Asia in the Twentieth Century
  • HS381 Search for the Divine: Hindu, Christian, Muslim, and Buddhist Ways in India
  • HS391 History of the Jesuits
  • HS444 War and Revolution: East Asia, 1937-1954
  • IB282 International Business
  • JP101 Japanese I
  • JP102 Japanese II
  • JP103 Japanese III
  • JP104 Japanese IV
  • JP201 Japanese Composition and Conversation
  • JP202 Advanced Japanese Composition and Conversation
  • ML285 The Passions of Ancient China: Love, War, and Rectitude in the Classic Literary Era
  • ML306 Old Wine in a New Bottle: Modern Film and Classical Chinese Tales
  • ML310 Introduction to Traditional Chinese Culture
  • ML324 Representations of Women in Premodern Chinese Literature
  • ML358 Japanese Thought and Culture
  • PL216 Philosophical Perspectives: Asian Thought
  • PL321 Cross-Cultural Philosophy
  • PL325 Philosophy of Asian Thought
  • PL354 East Asian Philosophy
  • PS302 Chinese Politics
  • PS351 Third World Politics
  • TH266 Christian Theology and World Religions
Notre Dame Electives
  • DHIS 211 Introduction to East Asian Civilization
  • DHIS 331 Modern China
  • DHIS 335 Modern Japan
  • DHIS 482 Asian Studies Seminar
  • DLJA 358 Japanese Thought and Culture
  • DENG 227 Japanese Literature (in translation)
  • DART 122 Survey of Asian Art
  • DART 413 Topics in Asian Art

MINOR IN CATHOLIC STUDIES

Contact: Vacant

Website: www.loyola.edu/catholicstudies

The Minor in Catholic Studies consists of courses which are devoted to the examination of topics, themes, or questions pertinent to Roman Catholic doctrine and faith in its various aspects. Illustrations of the principles and teachings of Roman Catholicism are found in literature, art, philosophy, the natural and social sciences, historical study, business disciplines, and theology. The minor consists of 18 credits, as follows:

  • TH203 Catholic Church: Life and Thought or
  • TH220 The Catholic Church in the United States
  • TH399 Contemporary Catholic Intellectual Life (capstone course)
  • Four Electives (12 credits; listed below)

TH203 or TH220 satisfies the second core requirement in theology, but it is not a prerequisite that must be satisfied before undertaking the other elective courses. Electives must be chosen from approved Catholic studies minor courses in such prescribed subject areas as theology, philosophy, history, English, biblical studies, fine arts, business studies, and the natural or social sciences. However, to insure the interdisciplinary character of the Catholic studies minor, students may take no more than two of these elective courses from the same subject area. Theology majors pursuing the Catholic studies minor should take all four of their elective courses from academic disciplines other than theology.

Electives

  • AH312 The Renaissance in Italy
  • AH313 Renaissance Art in Northern Europe
  • AH314 From Caravaggio to Rembrandt: Art of Baroque Europe
  • AH325 Gothic Art and Architecture
  • CL301 The Church and the Roman Empire
  • CL313 History of Christmas
  • CL324 Seminar: The Persecution of the Christians in the Roman World
  • EN328 Seminar in Literature and Catholicism (Pre-1800)
  • EN332 Literature and the Catholic Imagination (Pre-1800)
  • EN364 Literature and the Catholic Imagination (Post-1800)
  • EN365 Seminar in Literature and Catholicism (Post-1800)
  • HS301 The Church and the Roman Empire
  • HS303 The Early Middle Ages
  • HS305 The Later Middle Ages
  • HS313 History of Christmas
  • HS317 The Making of Modern Italy
  • HS370 The Jesuits in Asia Since 1542
  • HS381 Search for the Divine: Hindu, Christian, Muslim, and Buddhist Ways in India
  • HS382 Jesuits and Empire from the Society's Beginning to Its Suppression
  • HS383 The Cross and the Sword: Christianity and the Making of Colonial Latin America
  • HS391 History of the Jesuits
  • HS475 Seminar: The Persecution of the Christians in the Roman World
  • HS486 Seminar: The Great Age of the European Reconnaissance: Travel and Discovery
  • IT352 Dante's Divine Comedy
  • LT350 Readings in Medieval Latin I
  • LT351 Readings in Medieval Latin II
  • LW319 Special Topics in Law, Social Responsibility, and Catholic Studies
  • MG319 Special Topics in Catholic Studies
  • ML320 Liberation Theology from Its Origins
  • ML332 Dante's Divine Comedy (in translation)
  • PL313 Business Ethics and the Church
  • PL322 Nature: Mundane and Sacred
  • PL329 Philosophical Foundations of Catholic Social Thought
  • PL331 Natural Law and Natural Right
  • PL355 Philosophy of History
  • PL364 Renaissance Philosophy
  • PL369 Introduction to Saint Thomas Aquinas
  • PL370 Medieval Philosophy
  • PL401 Morals and Politics of the Lord of the Rings
  • PL404 Reason, Science, and Faith in the Modern Age
  • PL407 Marriage and Family through the Lens of Catholic Social Thought and Developmental Psychology
  • PL417 Beginning and End of Life
  • PY417 Special Topics in Psychology and Catholic Studies
  • SN392 Extirpation of Idolatries
  • TH202 Theology and Catholic Autobiography
  • TH204 The History and Theology of the Papacy
  • TH205 Christian Rome: Understanding Jesus Christ in Rome
  • TH211 Women in the Christian Tradition
  • TH214 Friends and Foes: Jews and Christians through the Ages
  • TH216 Ignatius and the Jesuits: History and Spirituality
  • TH218 Sacred Journeys: The History and Theology of Christian Pilgrimage
  • TH224 The Gospels and the Earliest Churches
  • TH225 Biographical Tales of the Bible
  • TH242 A History and Theology of Saints
  • TH243 Heaven and Hell
  • TH244 Forgiveness and Reconciliation
  • TH245 Eucharist (The Mass) in Ordinary Time
  • TH246 Who is Jesus?
  • TH247 The Presence of God: Christian Mysticism, East and West
  • TH249 Christian Sacraments
  • TH265 World Christianity
  • TH266 Christian Theology and World Religions
  • TH269 Theology and Literature
  • TH270 Creation and Evolution
  • TH301 Ethics: Theology and Ethics of Hospitality
  • TH303 Ethics: Ancient, Modern, and Christian Approaches to Ethics
  • TH304 Ethics: Introduction to Christian Ethics
  • TH307 Ethics: Marriage and Sexuality
  • TH308 Ethics: Justice and the Church in the World
  • TH310 Ethics: Peace Ethics
  • TH311 Ethics: Spirituality and Social Ethics - Biblical and Theological Perspectives
  • TH316 Ethics: Catholic Spiritual Life in the United States
  • TH319 Ethics: The Church and the Human Body
  • TH322 Christianity and Its Critics
  • TH325 From Christopher Columbus to Global Catholicism
  • TH326 Ignatius Loyola and the Spiritual Exercises
  • TH327 The Virgin Mary in Scripture and Tradition
  • TH329 Medieval Women Authors
  • TH331 Finding God in All Things: Spirituality and Prayer in the Christian Tradition
  • TH335 An Introduction to the Theology of Saint Augustine
  • TH336 Catholic Intellectual Life in the United States: Two Hundred Years of American Catholic Opinion
  • TH338 The Theology of Thomas Aquinas
  • TH346 Disputing the Bible
  • TH347 Jesus and the Gospels
  • TH349 Learn to Do Right: Biblical Perspectives on Social Justice
  • TH350 Prophets and Peacemakers
  • TH354 Male and Female in the Kingdom of God: Contemporary Gender Perspectives on the Bible
  • TH355 Saint Paul and His Writings
  • TH356 Genesis: Exploring the Bible's First Book
  • TH362 Hope, Death, and the End of the World
  • TH363 Sacraments and the Christian Life
  • TH364 What is Truth?
  • TH365 Theology and Art
  • TH366 Catholic Theology in Modernity
  • TH367 Vatican II and the Postconciliar World
  • TH369 Faith and Reason
  • TH381 Faith and Film: The Apostle's Creed in the American Cinema
  • TH384 Christianity and Islam
  • TH385 The Theological and the Religious in International Cinema
  • TH386 Fundamental Questions of Morality
  • TH387 International Catholic Literature in the Twentieth Century
  • TH398 Euthanasia and the Problem of Suffering
  • WR356 Writers in the Catholic Tradition: Selected Authors

MINOR IN FILM STUDIES

Contact: Nicholas A. Miller, Associate Professor of English

Office: Humanities Center, Room 242k

Telephone: 410-617-5695

Website: www.loyola.edu/academic/filmstudies

The Minor in Film Studies allows students to pursue an interdisciplinary curriculum focusing on the history and techniques of film--the dominant art form of the twentieth century. Requirements for the minor are as follows:

  • Fundamentals of Film Studies (WR344) or
  • History of Film (DR278/PT278)
  • Film Studies Capstone Seminar
  • Four Electives (12 credits; listed below)

No more than one of the electives may be at the 100- or 200-level. A student may receive credit for no more than one course taken prior to WR344. No more than two electives may come from the same department.

Electives

  • CL270 Greece and Rome on Film
  • CL341 Hollywood in Rome
  • CM204 Introduction to Multimedia
  • CM324 Video I
  • CM347 The Documentary Tradition
  • DR279 Silent Cinema
  • DR280 Classic Hollywood Film
  • DR281 Films of Alfred Hitchcock
  • EN180 Introduction to Film and Literature
  • EN336 Seminar in Literature and Film (Pre-1800)
  • EN380 The History of Narrative Cinema
  • EN382 Topics in Literature and Film Studies
  • EN386 Seminar in Literature and Film (Post-1800)
  • FR340 The Text and the Screen
  • GR309 The Classic German Cinema
  • GR341 Contemporary German Cinema
  • HS325 Europe Since 1945 through Film
  • HS359 African American History through Film
  • HS372 The Vietnam War through Film and Literature
  • HS374 East Asia on Film
  • HS375 Indian History, Culture, and Religion through Film
  • ML306 Old Wine in a New Bottle: Modern Film and Classical Chinese Tales
  • ML340 China through Film
  • ML341 Contemporary German Cinema
  • PL398 Philosophy and Film
  • PT279 Silent Cinema
  • PT280 Classic Hollywood Film
  • PT281 Films of Alfred Hitchcock
  • PT386 Video Art
  • TH381 Faith and Film: The Apostle's Creed in the American Cinema
  • TH385 The Theological and the Religious in International Cinema
  • WR345 Screen Writing for Film and Television
  • WR357 Writing about Film

MINOR IN FORENSIC STUDIES

Contact: David B. Rivers, Professor of Biology

Office: Donnelly Science Center, Room 258

Telephone: 410-617-2057

Forensic science/studies is a growing field that continues to gain relevance in all criminal investigations. According to the American Academy of Forensic Science, there is an increasing demand for individuals trained in forensic science, who specifically can apply advances in science and technology to criminal investigation with the purpose of solving crimes. While an undergraduate minor in forensic studies is not sufficient to practice in the field, it does serve to allow students to explore this expanding field out of intellectual curiosity; to develop and nurture their interests in forensic studies in an applied curriculum; and to obtain the necessary background to pursue professional or graduate training in this or related fields.

The Minor in Forensic Studies is an interdisciplinary program with involvement from the Departments of Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Engineering, History, Information Systems and Operations Management, Mathematics and Statistics, Philosophy, Physics, Psychology, and Sociology. Students are encouraged to take a range of courses from departments in the natural sciences, social sciences, and School of Business. During the senior year, students enroll in the Forensic Studies Experience, a specialized course of study emphasizing research, independent study, or internship focused on forensic studies/science.

Requirements for the minor are as follows:

  • BL101 Introduction to Forensic Science with Lab.
  • One capstone experience course, selected from the list below. The capstone experience is typically completed during the senior year, so students should secure a faculty sponsor and obtain the approval of the director of the forensic studies minor by the end of the junior year.
  • BL498 Forensic Studies Experience
  • CH498 Forensic Studies Experience
  • EG490 Forensic Studies Experience
  • PH498 Forensic Studies Experience
  • PY418 Research Seminar in Psychology I
  • PY419 Research Seminar in Psychology II
  • SC498 Forensic Studies Experience
  • Four electives, at least two of which are taken at the 300-level or above (listed below).

The following restrictions apply:

  • Students majoring in biology, chemistry, psychology, or sociology may count only one departmental course in both their major and the forensic studies minor. Two courses may count if the capstone course is also in the major.
  • Electives must be distributed minimally across two academic disciplines (e.g., BL, CH, EG, HS, IS, MA/ST, PL, PY, SC). For the purposes of the minor, MA and ST courses are considered the same discipline. At least one elective must be completed in each of two academic areas of study (e.g., natural sciences, social sciences, School of Business).
  • Only one elective course completed at another institution may count toward the minor, including study abroad, a consortium school, or a nonaffiliated institution.

Permission may be granted for students to enroll in courses for which prerequisites have not been met, following consultation with the appropriate department chair and the director of the forensic studies minor. Students should also consider completing some prerequisites as part of their natural science and social science core requirements.

Electives

  • BL322 Synthetic Biology with Lab
  • BL341 Molecular Genetics with Lab
  • BL351 Forensic Entomology with Lab
  • BL473 Special Topics in Forensic Biology
  • CS115 Introduction to Computers with Digital Forensics
  • CH201 Quantitative Analysis
  • CH410 Instrumental Methods (and CH411)
  • EG381 Probability and Statistics
  • HS330 Crime and Punishment in Modern Europe
  • IS358 Business Intelligence and Data Mining
  • MA251 Calculus I
  • MA252 Calculus II
  • PH383 Physics of Medicine and the Human Body
  • PH384 Waves and the Physics of Medicine
  • PL332 Security Ethics
  • PL333 Philosophy of Law
  • PY421 Forensic Psychology
  • SC330 Forensics
  • SC331 Deviance and Social Control
  • SC332 The Sociology of Crime and Criminals
  • SC333 Juvenile Delinquency
  • SC367 Criminal Justice
  • SC434 Seminar: Women and Deviance
  • SC435 Seminar: Forensic Sociology
  • ST210 Introduction to Statistics
  • ST265 Biostatistics
  • ST381 Probability and Statistics

MINOR IN GENDER STUDIES

Contact: Janine P. Holc, Associate Professor of Political Science

Office: Beatty Hall, Room 306d

Telephone: 410-617-2922

The term gender refers to the creation and imposition of sex roles in cultures and societies. Gender overlies the neurobiological data of sex and embodiment. For this reason, courses in gender studies analyze gender as an element of social relationships and human experiences including, among others, those of race, ethnicity, and class. Gender studies courses use the resources, theories, and methodologies of a variety of academic fields, leading to a more sophisticated understanding of the sex/gender systems themselves.

The gender studies minor prepares students to enter the growing number of graduate programs in women's and cultural studies, not to mention affording focus for students in prelaw, political science, psychology, sociology, and theology. Most important, the gender studies minor allows students majoring in various disciplines to come together and express different viewpoints and ways of thinking on a common subject. The requirements for the Minor in Gender Studies are the successful completion of the following:

  • Introduction to Gender Studies (SC210)
  • Gender Studies Capstone Seminar
  • Four Electives (12 credits; see below)

No more than two of the four electives may come from the same department. Also, no more than two of the electives may be at the 100- or 200-level.

Electives

  • AH200 Women in Art
  • AH202 African Art
  • AH316 Realism and Impressionism
  • CL211 Classical Mythology
  • CL301 The Church and the Roman Empire
  • CL329 Women in Greece and Rome
  • CL334 Roman Private Life
  • EN211 Major Writers: Classical Mythology
  • EN302 Medieval Love
  • EN379 Gender in American Literature
  • EN389 Seminar in Literature and Gender
  • FR351 French Women Writers of the Renaissance
  • FR375 Women's Voices in the Francophone World
  • GR358 Sexual Politics in German Drama
  • HS301 The Church and the Roman Empire
  • HS329 Women in Greece and Rome
  • HS334 Roman Private Life
  • HS344 American Women's History
  • HS367 Black Women in the Atlantic World
  • HS389 Women and Social Change in Modern Africa
  • HS414 Women in Europe
  • HS448 Women and Gender in the Middle East
  • IT351 Italian Women Writers of the Renaissance
  • ML324 Representations of Women in Premodern Chinese Literature
  • ML375 Women and Men in Twentieth-Century Latin American Literature
  • PL232 Philosophical Perspectives: Gender and Nature
  • PL337 Philosophy and Feminism
  • PL339 Twentieth-Century Women Philosophers
  • PS364 International Relations through Non-Western Lenses
  • PS392 Sexual Politics
  • PY254 Psychology of Women
  • PY351 Interpersonal Behavior
  • PY353 Contemporary Issues in Psychology
  • SC104 Cultural Anthropology
  • SC204 The Family
  • SC207 Protest: Legacy of the Sixties
  • SC220 Sociology of Sexuality
  • SC221 Sociology of Race, Class, and Gender
  • SC341 Independent Study in Gender Studies
  • SC361 Social Inequality
  • SC421 Seminar: Race, Class, Gender, Sexuality
  • SC434 Seminar: Women and Deviance
  • SN335 Contemporary Spanish Literature: 1975 to the Present
  • SN365 Latin American Essay and Early Cultural Studies
  • SN370 Nineteenth-Century Latin American Novel
  • SN375 Women and Men in Twentieth-Century Latin American Literature
  • SN380 Modernismo
  • TH211 Women in the Christian Tradition
  • TH329 Medieval Women Authors
  • TH354 Male and Female in the Kingdom of God: Contemporary Gender Perspectives on the Bible
  • WR322 Gendered Rhetoric
  • WR351 Art of the Essay: Women Writers

MINOR IN ITALIAN STUDIES

Contacts: Leslie Zarker Morgan, Associate Professor of Modern Languages and Literatures (French and Italian); Steven C. Hughes, Professor of History

Office: Maryland Hall, Room 461; Humanities Center, Room 301

Telephone: 410-617-2926; 410-617-2229

Website: www.loyola.edu/academic/modernlanguages/curriculum/minors/italian-minor

The interdisciplinary Minor in Italian Studies improves student understanding of the complexities in contemporary Italy, while also engaging students in an unusually rich intellectual experience. It offers students a unique opportunity to experience first-hand the confluence of cultural and religious forces in the Italian peninsula. It not only speaks to the Jesuit mission to impart knowledge in the classroom, but also allows students who desire to pursue a better understanding of their faith to do so by living in the center of the Catholic tradition in Rome. While inspiring students to understand traditional Italian culture, this program also requires them to understand the cultural and political traditions that consistently extend beyond the peninsula, and even the Mediterranean, to effect cultural and economic exchanges between the Italian peninsula and the rest of the globe.

This program serves undergraduates majoring in a broad range of fields: liberal arts, science, social science and business. The program follows a curriculum that utilizes current theory and practice, exposes students to cultural diversity, and strongly supports study abroad in the Italian environment to hone those skills. The minor contributes to the specific Loyola learning aims of intellectual excellence, critical understanding, eloquentia perfecta, diversity, aesthetics, and faith and mission. The minor consists of 18 credits, as follows:

  • Three courses in Italian above the 100-level, one of which must be taken at the 300-level (9 credits)
  • Two electives in other fields related to Italian Studies (6 credits; listed below)
  • Capstone course, Italy and Italians in Todayís World (ML380; 3 credits)

Courses must be distributed minimally across three disciplines (e.g., EN, HS, IT, ML). Two courses may be cross-counted between the Italian studies minor and another major or minor, as long as the department chair in the other major or minor is in agreement.

A service-learning or study abroad/international experience is strongly recommended. The international experience must be in Italy, and up to three study abroad courses can count toward the Italian studies minor. Upon their return from study abroad, all students with a Minor in Italian Studies must take at least one 300-level course in Italian. The service-learning option is integral to an approved Italian studies course and entails working with a group of Italophones in the greater Baltimore area.

The program advisor will work with each student to develop a coherent program of study, guide the student, and meet informally at least once a semester to assist the student in course selection and planning.

Electives

  • AH309 Art of Ancient Rome
  • AH312 The Renaissance in Italy
  • AH314 From Caravaggio to Rembrandt: Art of Baroque Europe
  • AH322 Michelangelo
  • CL211 Classical Mythology
  • CL218 The Golden Age of Rome
  • CL300 Death of the Roman Republic
  • CL301 The Church and the Roman Empire
  • CL302 City of Rome
  • CL309 Art of Ancient Rome
  • CL314 History of Roman Empire
  • CL334 Roman Private Life
  • CL337 The Multicultural Roman Empire
  • CL350 Introduction to European Culture
  • CL421 Caesar and Augustus
  • EN211 Major Writers: Classical Mythology
  • EN218 Major Writers: The Golden Age of Rome
  • HS300 Death of the Roman Republic
  • HS301 The Church and the Roman Empire
  • HS314 History of Roman Empire
  • HS317 The Making of Modern Italy
  • HS321 Topics in Italian History
  • HS334 Roman Private Life
  • HS337 The Multicultural Roman Empire
  • HS418 Mussolini and Fascist Italy
  • HS421 Caesar and Augustus
  • IT201 Italian Conversation and Composition
  • IT202 The Living Language
  • IT205 Italian for Business
  • IT212 Italian Language and Culture II: Rome
  • IT213 Italian Language and Culture III: Rome
  • IT214 Oral Proficiency in Rome
  • IT301 Italian Literature and Civilization I: Origins to Reformation
  • IT302 Italian Literature and Civilization II: Romanticism
  • IT303 Italian Literature and Civilization III: Realism
  • IT304 Italian Literature and Civilization IV: Contemporary Italy
  • IT310 The Cinema of Italy
  • IT321 Italy Today
  • IT333 Topics in Italian Renaissance Literature
  • IT352 Danteís Divine Comedy
  • LT308 Vergil: Aeneid
  • LT311 Cicero
  • LT315 Tacitus and Suetonius
  • LT320 Livy
  • LT330 Roman Historians
  • LT333 Sallust
  • LT334 Roman Lyric
  • LT340 Roman Comedy
  • LT344 Horace
  • LT355 Petronius and Apuleius
  • LT356 Apuleius
  • LT374 Roman Satire
  • LT380 Ovid
  • LT386 Ovidís Metamorphoses
  • ML251 Introduction to Medieval Italian Literature
  • ML302 Italian Romanticism and Western Literary Tradition
  • ML325 Topics in Italian Literature in English Translation
  • ML332 Danteís Divine Comedy (in translation)
  • ML333 Witches, Giants, and Tyrants, Oh My!
  • PL364 Renaissance Philosophy
  • TH204 The History and Theology of the Papacy
  • TH205 Christian Rome: Understanding Jesus Christ in Rome

Approval Required: The electives listed below may be counted toward the minor if, in a given semester, the course meets one of the following requirements:

  • At least one-half of the course material involves Italian or Italian tradition as measured through written work and topics covered through lecture, reading, and testing.
  • The student completes a final project involving Italy (its culture, literature, and/or history/social situation).
  • It is taught in Italian about Italian materials.
  • EC440 International Financial Economics
  • EC446 International Trade
  • EN312 Seminar in Shakespeare
  • EN313 Renaissance Literature
  • EN317 Seminar in Renaissance Literature
  • IB282 International Business
  • IB415 International Management
  • IB482 Global Strategy
  • IB499 International Business Internship
  • LW410 International Business Law
  • MK348 International Marketing: European Study Tour (includes a trip to Rome)
  • MU309 Opera and Theater
  • PS350 Introduction to Comparative Politics
  • PS365 International Politics
  • PS366 International Political Economy
  • PY201 Social Psychology
  • PY253 Multicultural Issues in Psychology
  • WR355 Travel Writing

Students are encouraged to perfect their knowledge of the Italian language. Upper-level courses are also offered at the Johns Hopkins University and Towson University. Students may take electives through the Baltimore Student Exchange Program at other area colleges and universities; however, these courses must be preapproved by the minor advisor or program director. Students may arrange for a language proficiency test through the American Council for the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) for a fee.

MINOR IN LATIN AMERICAN AND LATINO STUDIES

Contacts: Bill M. Donovan, Associate Professor of History (Program Advisor); Thomas Ward, Professor of Spanish (Program Director)

Office: Humanities Center, Room 309; Maryland Hall, Room 351i

Telephone: 410-617-2891; 410-617-2370

Website: www.loyola.edu/latinostudies

The interdisciplinary Minor in Latin American and Latino Studies (LALS) is built on a historical, cultural, literary, sociological, and political understanding of the Spanish, Portuguese, and French-speaking regions of the Americas. Students come to appreciate the diversity of Latin American and U.S. Latino experiences by studying Latin Americans from all countries, including the United States. The minor consists of 18 credits, as follows:

  • Introduction to Latin American and Latino Studies (HS392 or ML392)
  • Five Electives (15 credits; listed below)

Courses must be distributed minimally across three disciplines (e.g., HS, ML, PS, SN). Three electives must be taken at the 300-level or above; two may be taken at the 200-level or above. No more than four courses can be taken from a department that contains more than one discipline. Two courses may be cross-counted between LALS and another major or minor with the approval of the department chair(s).

A service-learning or study abroad experience is required. The international experience must be in Latin America, and up to three study-abroad courses can count toward the LALS minor. The service-learning option would be integral to an approved LALS elective course and entails working with any group of Franco-Luso-Hispanic peoples in the Baltimore area. To allow for greater curricular flexibility, it is recommended that students declare the minor in their sophomore year, especially if they will be studying abroad during their junior year.

The program advisor will work with each student to develop a coherent program of study, guide the student, and meet informally at least once a semester to converse and look for connections between courses. Students are required to complete and submit a final portfolio of their work.

Electives

  • FR205 Living and Working in the French Caribbean Today
  • FR305 Living and Working in the French Caribbean Today
  • HS379 Latin America and the United States Since Independence
  • HS383 The Cross and the Sword: Christianity and the Making of Colonial Latin America
  • HS384 Modern Latin America
  • HS386 Soldiers and Guerillas in Modern Latin America
  • HS440 Special Topics in Latin American and Latino Studies
  • HS446 Modern Latin American Cities
  • HS487 Seminar: Comparative Revolutions in Latin America
  • HS488 Seminar: Political Violence and Terrorism in the Modern World
  • ML205 Living and Working in the French Caribbean Today
  • ML320 Liberation Theology from Its Origins
  • ML362 The Early Latino Experience in the United States
  • ML363 Voices across America: A Symphony of Thought
  • ML375 Women and Men in Twentieth-Century Latin American Literature
  • ML404 Another America, Central America
  • ML440 Special Topics in Latin American and Latino Studies
  • ML441 Modern Hispanic American Fiction
  • PO204 Portuguese for Speakers of Spanish
  • PS303 Latin American Politics
  • SN201 Spanish Composition and Conversation
  • SN203 Introduction to Reading Literature
  • SN304 Contemporary Central America
  • SN305 Visual Culture in Colonial Latin America
  • SN306 Literature and Identity Politics in Peru
  • SN308 Violence and Culture: Columbia in the Twentieth Century
  • SN329 Spanish in the United States
  • SN350 Short Latin American Fiction
  • SN354 Contemporary Latin American Literature
  • SN360 Latin American Short Story
  • SN365 Latin American Essay and Early Cultural Studies
  • SN366 Latin American Testimony
  • SN368 Travelers and Migrants in Twentieth-Century Columbian Literature
  • SN369 From Baroque to Enlightenment: Novo-Hispanic Perspectives
  • SN370 Nineteenth-Century Latin American Novel
  • SN375 Women and Men in Twentieth-Century Latin American Literature
  • SN380 Modernismo
  • SN381 Latin American Avant-Garde
  • SN390 Chronicles of Conquest, Resistance and Transculturation
  • SN391 Travel Writings of the New World
  • SN392 Extirpation of Idolatries
  • TH265 World Christianity

Approval Required: The following electives may be counted toward the minor if a final paper or project is geared toward Latin America or U.S. Latinos (paper will become part of portfolio). "Latin America" includes any historically Spanish, Portuguese, or French speaking area, as well as the Caribbean. The minor advisor or program director must approve these courses, and it is the studentís responsibility to work with the course instructor to ensure that the final project is on Latin America.

  • EC348 Development Economics
  • EC440 International Financial Economics
  • FR304 Culture and Civilization IV: Introduction to Francophone Cultures
  • HS382 Jesuits and Empire from the Societyís Beginnings to Its Suppression
  • IB282 International Business
  • IB470 Special Topics in International Business
  • PS351 Third World Politics
  • PS370 Theories of International Relations
  • SC210 Introduction to Gender Studies
  • SN205 Spanish for Business
  • SN303 Hispanic Film

Students are encouraged to study and perfect their knowledge of Spanish, Portuguese, or French. Students may take electives offered through the Baltimore Student Exchange Program at other area colleges and universities; however, these courses must be preapproved by the minor advisor or program director.

MINOR IN MEDIEVAL STUDIES

Contact: Leslie Zarker Morgan, Associate Professor of Modern Languages and Literatures (French and Italian)

Office: Maryland Hall, Room 461

Telephone: 410-617-2926

Website: www.loyola.edu/academic/medievalstudies

This program enables students to pursue an interdisciplinary program organized around the medieval time period, broadly defined. Students concentrating in a related area such as art, history, languages, music, philosophy, political science, or theology are encouraged to minor in medieval studies in order to broaden their comprehension of the cultural structures influencing their area of interest.

Requirements for the minor (19 credits) consist of six electives and a one-credit, interdisciplinary independent study (ML400) done in connection with the sixth course. Students pursuing honors degrees in departments with honors programs may substitute their honors project for the final course and independent study (18 credits). The following restrictions apply:

  • no more than two courses can be taken in any one discipline (e.g., EN, HS, ML);
  • no more than two courses can be taken on one study abroad program;
  • two courses should be taken at the 300-level.

Students are encouraged to study and perfect their knowledge of Latin, especially if they are planning on going to graduate school in the field.

Electives

  • AH312 The Renaissance in Italy
  • AH313 Renaissance Art in Northern Europe
  • AH325 Gothic Art and Architecture
  • CL301 The Church and the Roman Empire
  • CL314 History of the Roman Empire
  • CL324 Seminar: The Persecution of the Christians in the Roman World
  • EN301 Chaucer
  • EN302 Medieval Love
  • EN304 Arthur and Other Heroes
  • EN306 Topics in Medieval Literature
  • EN307 Seminar in Medieval Literature
  • FR350 Sex and Violence/Sin and Repentance: Medieval French Literature for Modern Readers
  • FR351 French Women Writers of the Renaissance
  • FR370 Special Topics in Medieval Literature
  • FR371 Love's Fatal Triangle: Courtly Love and the Development of Arthurian Literature in Medieval French Literature
  • GR301 German Culture and Civilization I
  • GR305 Dungeons, Dragons, Damsels in Distress
  • HS301 The Church and the Roman Empire
  • HS303 The Early Middle Ages
  • HS304 Renaissance and Reformation in Europe
  • HS305 The Later Middle Ages
  • HS306 Medieval Cities
  • HS314 History of the Roman Empire
  • HS335 History of the Crusades
  • HS339 The Fall of Two Empires: Rome and Byzantium
  • HS410 Special Topics: The Crusades
  • HS413 Medieval Military History
  • HS470 Seminar: The Hundred Years War
  • HS472 Seminar: Frontiers and Frontier Peoples in the Middle Ages
  • HS477 Seminar: Legends in Medieval History
  • IT301 Italian Literature and Civilization I: Origins to Reformation
  • IT333 Topics in Italian Renaissance Literature
  • IT351 Italian Women Writers of the Renaissance
  • IT352 Dante's Divine Comedy
  • LT104 Latin Golden Age Prose and Poetry
  • LT308 Vergil: Aeneid
  • LT350 Readings in Medieval Latin I
  • LT351 Readings in Medieval Latin II
  • LT380 Ovid
  • LT386 Ovid's Metamorphoses
  • ML250 Introduction to Medieval Literature: Selected Languages
  • ML251 Introduction to Medieval Italian Literature
  • ML305 Dungeons, Dragons, Damsels in Distress
  • ML332 Dante's Divine Comedy (in translation)
  • ML333 Witches, Giants, and Tyrants, Oh My!
  • ML371 Love's Fatal Triangle: Courtly Love and the Development of Arthurian Literature in Medieval French Literature
  • PL369 Introduction to Saint Thomas Aquinas
  • PL370 Medieval Philosophy
  • SN352 The Golden Age
  • TH329 Medieval Women Authors
  • TH335 An Introduction to the Theology of Saint Augustine
  • TH338 The Theology of Thomas Aquinas
  • TH365 Theology and Art

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Course descriptions and prerequisites can be accessed by following the links on this page or by visiting the sponsoring department's chapter in this catalogue.

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