2013 - 2014
Undergraduate Catalogue

Classics

Office: Humanities Center, Room 305

Telephone: 410-617-2326

Website: www.loyola.edu/classics

FACULTY

Chair: Joseph J. Walsh, Professor

Professors: Robert S. Miola; Martha C. Taylor; Joseph J. Walsh

Assistant Professors: David J. Jacobson; Thomas D. McCreight; Nandini B. Pandey


The department offers a Major in Classics (Latin and Greek) or Classical Civilization, as well as a Minor in Classical Civilization. In order to understand themselves and the modern world, undergraduates enrolled in departmental offerings study closely the minds of ancient Rome and Greece through their languages, literature, and culture.

MAJOR IN CLASSICS

Learning Goals

  • Students will be able to read Greek and/or Latin with good comprehension of content, style, and nuance.
  • Students will have a clear appreciation of the power of language and of aesthetic issues relating to language.
  • Students will be able to think critically and write persuasively.
  • Students will know and understand the origins of key concepts and institutions in western thought.
  • Students will have an appreciation of the multicultural nature of classical antiquity as a means to better understand our comparably multicultural world.
  • Students will acquire facility in interdisciplinary thinking and develop an ability to think outside the boundaries of traditional disciplines.
  • Students will read and discuss select passages of Vergilís epic Aeneid in the original with attention to content, style, and literary technique.
  • Students will read and discuss select passages of Homerís epic Iliad and/or Odyssey in the original with attention to content, style, and literary technique.
  • Students will display both in oral translation and discussion in class as well as in written assignments facility with the works and historical context of at least six different Latin or Greek authors or literary genres.
  • Students will display facility in Latin prose composition.

Bachelor of Arts

Requirements for a major and an example of a typical program of courses are as follows:

  • Eight, three-credit courses in Latin beyond two years of secondary school Latin or their college equivalent (LT101, LT102). Advanced Greek reading courses may be substituted for Latin electives. The Senior Honors Thesis (CL450) is an Honors option available to qualified senior majors. The course involves an independent study and a thesis, and it may be substituted for up to two Latin electives.
  • Latin Prose Composition (LT300).
  • Four courses in Greek (GK101, GK102, GK103, GK104).

Freshman Year

Fall Term

    HS101 Europe and the World Since 1500**
    LT103 Intermediate Latin*
    Math/Science Core**
    Social Science Core**
    Elective

Spring Term

    LT104 Latin Golden Age Prose and Poetry*
    WR100 Effective Writing**
    Math/Science Core**
    Social Science Core**
    Elective

Sophomore Year

Fall Term

    EN101 Understanding Literature**
    PL201 Foundations of Philosophy**
    TH201 Introduction to Theology** or
    Elective
    Math/Science Core**
    Latin Elective*

Spring Term

    PL200-Level Philosophical Perspectives Course**
    English Core**
    History Core**
    Theology Core or
    Elective
    Latin Elective*

Junior Year

Fall Term

    GK101 Introductory Greek I*
    TH201 Introduction to Theology** or
    Elective
    Latin Elective*
    Nondepartmental Elective
    Elective

Spring Term

    GK102 Introductory Greek II*
    Theology Core** or
    Elective
    Latin Elective*
    Nondepartmental Elective
    Elective

Senior Year

Fall Term

    GK103 Intermediate Greek*
    LT300 Latin Prose Composition*
    Fine Arts Core**
    Latin Elective*
    Elective

Spring Term

    GK104 Greek Literature*
    Ethics Core**
    Latin Elective*
    Nondepartmental Elective
    Elective

* Required for major. Greek electives may be substituted for Latin electives.

** Terms may be interchanged.

  1. CL211, CL212, CL213, CL214, and CL218 are cross-listed with English. CL300, CL301, CL312, CL313, CL314, CL320, CL324, CL326, CL329, CL334, and CL337 are cross-listed with history. These courses fulfill English and history core requirements.
  2. CL241, CL308, and CL309 are cross-listed with fine arts. CL308 and CL309 fulfill major requirements for art history and visual arts majors.
  3. CL380 and CL381 are cross-listed with political science. These courses fulfill major requirements for political science majors.
  4. Students must complete the diversity core requirement through a designated diversity core, major, or elective course (see Diversity Core Requirement under Curriculum and Policies).

MAJOR IN CLASSICAL CIVILIZATION

Learning Goals

  • Students will be able to read Greek and/or Latin with good comprehension of content, style, and nuance.
  • Students will have a clear appreciation of the power of language and of aesthetic issues relating to language.
  • Students will be able to think critically and write persuasively.
  • Students will know and understand the origins of key concepts and institutions in western thought.
  • Students will have an appreciation of the multicultural nature of classical antiquity as a means to better understand our comparably multicultural world.
  • Students will acquire facility in interdisciplinary thinking and develop an ability to think outside the boundaries of traditional disciplines.
  • Students will read with attention to content, style, and nuance intermediate texts in Greek.
  • Students will read and discuss select passages of either Vergilís epic Aeneid or Homerís Iliad and/or Odyssey in the original with attention to content, style, and literary technique.
  • Students will display both in oral translation and discussion in class as well as written assignments facility with the works and historical context of at least two different Latin or Greek authors or literary genres.
  • Students will display an understanding of at least four different topic areas in classical antiquity (e.g., "The Multicultural Roman Empire" or "Classical Mythology") through classroom performance and critical essays.

Bachelor of Arts

Requirements for a major and an example of a typical program of courses are as follows:

  • Six, three-credit courses in Latin or Greek. Of the six language courses at least two must be in Greek and at least four must be at the intermediate or advanced level. Introductory Latin courses (LT101, LT102) do not count for the major.
  • Six classical civilization courses (in translation; most are cross-listed with other departments), but only two of these courses may be taken in fine arts. Additional Greek and/or Latin courses may be substituted for up to two of these courses. HN201 may be double-counted as one of these courses. Honors Program seminars on classical topics may be double-counted as classical civilization courses with the approval of both the department chair and the Honors Program director. Up to two departmentally-approved courses focusing on the ancient world that are not officially cross-listed in the Classics Department may double-count as classical civilization courses for the major.
  • The Senior Honors Thesis (CL450) is an honors option available to qualified senior majors. The course involves an independent study and a thesis, and it may be substituted for up to two major courses.
  • For students double-majoring in classical civilization and an allied major (such as English, history, art history, philosophy, political science, or theology), the department allows departmentally-approved courses to double-count for both majors so long as the other department chair also agrees. Students interested in double-majoring should consult both departments early in their career.

Freshman Year

Fall Term

    HS101 Europe and the World Since 1500**
    LT103 Intermediate Latin*
    Math/Science Core**
    Social Science Core**
    Elective

Spring Term

    LT104 Latin Golden Age Prose and Poetry*
    WR100 Effective Writing**
    Math/Science Core**
    Social Science Core**
    Elective

Sophomore Year

Fall Term

    EN101 Understanding Literature**
    PL201 Foundations of Philosophy**
    Math/Science Core**
    Classical Civilization Elective*
    Latin Elective*

Spring Term

    PL200-Level Philosophical Perspectives Course**
    English Core**
    History Core**
    Classical Civilization Elective *
    Latin Elective*

Junior Year

Fall Term

    GK101 Introductory Greek I*
    TH201 Introduction to Theology**
    Classical Civilization Elective*
    Nondepartmental Elective
    Elective

Spring Term

    GK102 Introductory Greek II*
    Theology Core**
    Classical Civilization Elective*
    Nondepartmental Elective
    Elective

Senior Year

Fall Term

    GK103 Intermediate Greek* or
    Classical Civilization Elective or
    Latin Elective
    Fine Arts Core**
    Elective*
    Elective
    Elective

Spring Term

    GK104 Greek Literature or
    Classical Civilization Elective or
    Latin Elective
    Ethics Core**
    Nondepartmental Elective
    Elective*

* Required for major.

** Terms may be interchanged.

  1. CL211, CL212, CL213, CL214, and CL218 are cross-listed with English. CL300, CL301, CL312, CL313, CL314, CL320, CL324, CL326, CL329, CL334, and CL337 are cross-listed with history. These courses fulfill English and history core requirements.
  2. CL241, CL308, and CL309 are cross-listed with fine arts. CL308 and CL309 fulfill major requirements for art history and visual arts majors.
  3. CL380 and CL381 are cross-listed with political science. These courses fulfill major requirements for political science majors.
  4. Students must complete the diversity core requirement through a designated diversity core, major, or elective course (see Diversity Core Requirement under Curriculum and Policies).

MINOR IN CLASSICAL CIVILIZATION

The Minor in Classical Civilization is a true interdisciplinary area studies program on a small scale. It offers the astute undergraduate a unique opportunity to fulfill a number of core requirements (language, English, history) while pursuing a major in a chosen field.

Requirements for a minor are as follows:

  • Four, three-credit courses in either Greek or Latin (at least three of these courses should generally be taken at Loyola). All three-credit Greek and Latin courses taken at Loyola (or for which Loyola offers credit) can count toward the minor.
  • Three courses in classical civilization at the 200- or 300-level, but only two of these courses may be taken in fine arts. One classical civilization course is ordinarily in ancient history (either Roman or Greek). A fifth language course may be substituted for a classical civilization requirement. HN201 may be double-counted as one classical civilization course. Honors Program seminars on classical topics may be double-counted as classical civilization courses. One departmentally-approved course focusing on the ancient world and not officially cross-listed in the Classics Department may double-count as a classical civilization course for the minor.

© Loyola University Maryland. All rights reserved. Send comments or questions to the catalogues webmaster.