2013 - 2014
Graduate Catalogue

Education Specialties

Office: Timonium Campus

Telephone: 410-617-5094/5095

Website: www.loyola.edu/schoolofeducation

CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION

Programs:

Master of Arts (M.A.) - 33 credits
Master of Education (M.Ed.) - 33 credits
Certificate of Advanced Study (C.A.S.) - 30 credits beyond master's degree

Master of Arts (M.A.)

This 33-credit program is designed to expose students to critical perspectives on improvement and reform in K-12 education. Through a strong focus on questions of equity and social justice, the program prepares leaders who will be at the forefront of meaningful debate and effective change. Framed by an interdisciplinary approach, the program provides students with new perspectives on the causes of and solutions to problems such as achievement gaps, subpar academic performance, and unsafe schools. Through the study of the state-of-the-art education theory and practice, students will learn ways to transform student learning and improve schools.

Curriculum and Instruction Core (24 credits)

  • ED601 Philosophical Foundations of Diversity and Social Justice in Education
  • ED608 Educational Innovations
  • ED611 History of Education in the United States
  • ED650 Curriculum Theories and Practices
  • ED652 Evaluation and Assessment Policies and Practices
  • ED659 Race, Class, and Gender Studies in Education
  • ED670 Teacher Research and Inquiry
  • ED800 Thesis Seminar* or
  • ED805 Capstone Seminar

* Students may choose ED800 or ED805 upon discussion with their advisor.

Educational Specialization (9 credits)

Students may select an area of special interest and three courses from the following suggested choices to provide a focus for their general studies. Alternately, students may work with their advisors to choose a specialized, thematic collection of courses across the disciplines.

Educational Leadership

  • AD662 Leadership, Supervision and Professional Development
  • AD674 Human Relations in School Management
  • AD683 Leadership Theories and Practices in Education

Students specializing in educational leadership who successfully complete the requirements for the master's degree may elect to satisfy the MSDE requirements for Administrator 1 Certification by reapplying to Loyola (application fee waived) as a special student and completing the following courses:

  • AD668 The Law, the Courts, and the School
  • AD687 Internship in Educational Leadership

Educational Technology

  • ET605 Introduction to Educational Technology
  • ET610 Curricular Applications of Technology
  • ET620 Multimedia Design in the Classroom
  • ET630 Digital Communication in the Classroom
  • ET690 Educational Technology Seminar

Literacy

  • RE510 Foundations of Reading Instruction
  • RE523 Emergent Literacy Development
  • RE601 Media Literacy Education
  • RE622 Children's and Adolescent Literature
  • RE737 Literacy Assessments in Group Contexts

Special Education

  • SE761 Introduction to Special Education
  • SE905 Characteristics of Learners with Mild and Moderate Disabilities
  • SE909 Instruction in Elementary Content Areas for Students with Mild and Moderate Disabilities
  • SE914 Communication, Collaboration and Consultation with Parents and Professionals Serving Students with Disabilities
  • SE917 Instruction in Secondary Content Areas for Students with Mild and Moderate Disabilities
  • SE921 Autism: Characteristics, Research, and Interventions
  • SE922 Medical Aspects of Developmental Disabilities
  • SE926 Communication Development and Early Literacy: Materials, Resources, and Instructional Strategies (Focus: Birth to Age 5)

Liberal Studies

  • LS606 Popular Culture in America
  • LS625 The American Civil Rights Movement, 1954-1976
  • LS645 The Pre-Civil Rights Movement: The Generation before Brown, 1932-1954
  • LS657 Coercive Democracy and Nation Building
  • LS664 Work and American Identity
  • LS745 After King: Civil Rights and the Black Freedom Movement, 1968-1985
  • LS747 New Myths on the American Landscape: Writing (and) the American Dream

Master of Education (M.Ed.)

The M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction is a 33-credit program designed for elementary and middle school teachers. The program focuses on science education. Six courses are science content courses with emphasis on process skills and hands-on activities. The remaining five required courses are designed specifically for those enrolled in the program and incorporate science content topics and issues. This program is offered in a cohort-only format. As such, prospective students should check with the program director for available cohort groups prior to applying.

Curriculum and Instruction Core (15 credits)

  • ED650 Curriculum Theories and Practices
  • ED659 Race, Class, and Gender Studies in Education
  • ED670 Teacher Research and Inquiry
  • ED805 Capstone Seminar
  • TE602 Educational Psychology

Science Content (18 credits)

  • ED700 Earth Science I (Elementary/Middle)
  • ED702 Earth Science II (Elementary/Middle)
  • ED703 Life Science (Elementary/Middle)
  • ED704 Physical Science I (Elementary/Middle)
  • ED705 Physical Science II (Elementary/Middle)
  • ED706 Environmental Field Study

Certificate of Advanced Study (C.A.S.)

Advanced graduate work beyond the master's degree may be pursued in specific program areas. The 30-credit program leads to a Certificate of Advanced Study (C.A.S.). Requirements are 18 hours of coursework in a specific area of concentration and 12 hours of coursework in other areas. Students must meet with an advisor prior to beginning the program.

For information about the estimated costs, related standard occupations, and normal completion time for this program, visit www.loyola.edu/department/consumer-information.

EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP

The graduate program in educational leadership is a unique blend of theory and practical application geared toward educators with an inner passion for leading and facilitating improved student achievement and teacher performance. Ideal for successful teachers who want to make a difference on a larger scale, the program focuses on the necessary knowledge, skills, and dispositions of leadership for the twenty-first-century educational environment. Each of the courses in the program is aligned to the National Standards for Educational Leadership and the Maryland Instructional Leadership Framework.

All program courses are based upon current research and best practices in educational leadership. Students are expected to read and analyze current research; blend theory and practice as it relates to the course; emphasize personal dimensions by focusing on leader behaviors, interpersonal skills, and the demands and rights of a multicultural society; and include a problem-solving orientation to encourage thinking, collaboration, and relevance to the contemporary education environment.

Programs:

Master of Arts (M.A.) - 45 credits (includes 6 thesis credits)
Master of Education (M.Ed.) - 42 credits
Certification in Administration and Supervision - 18 credits in addition to an existing master's degree and 27 months of successful teaching
Certificate of Advanced Study (C.A.S.) - 30 credits beyond master's degree

Upon completion of the M.Ed. or the postmaster's 18-credit program and 27 months of successful teaching, students are eligible for certification as Administrator I (Assistant in Administration, Supervisor in Central Administration, Supervisor in Instruction). All candidates for a degree or certificate are to take the School Leaders Licensure Assessment (SLLA) or other assessment that may be required for certification as Administrator II (principal) by the Maryland State Department of Education. Students are strongly encouraged to have scores from this assessment forwarded to Loyola for data collection and program analysis and improvement.

Master of Education (M.Ed.)

Forty-two credits of required coursework must be completed. The following are required courses to be completed in three phases. Courses in each phase are prerequisites for courses in subsequent phases. Courses within each phase may be taken in any order. Phase I courses should be taken early in the program.

Phase I (12 credits)

  • AD680 Leadership Seminar
  • AD683 Leadership Theories and Practices in Education
  • ED600 Foundations of Research in Education
  • ED601 Philosophical Foundations of Diversity and Social Justice in Education

Phase II (27 credits)

  • AD662 Leadership, Supervision, and Professional Development
  • AD668 The Law, the Courts, and the School
  • AD674 Human Relations in School Management
  • AD681 Organizational Development in Education
  • AD686 The Instructional Leader and Assessing Student Learning
  • AD776 Theory and Research on Educational Leadership
  • ED650 Curriculum Theories and Practices

Phase III: Electives (6 credits/select 2)

  • AD682 Technology for School Leaders
  • AD684 Resource Management
  • AD786 Instructional Leadership in Literacy for School Leaders: Creating a Culture of Literacy in Schools and Communities
  • AD932 Special Education Law and Compliance for School Leaders

Phase IV (3 credits)

  • AD687 Internship in Educational Leadership

The programs in educational leadership qualifying for state certification have been approved by the Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE) and meet both state and national standards.

Certification in Administration and Supervision

A person with a master's degree from an accredited institution and 27 months of satisfactory teaching performance or satisfactory performance as a specialist may complete state certification requirements by earning 18 semester hours of graduate coursework. Students must apply and meet with their advisors to develop their programs. A sample program of study is as follows:

School Administration

  • AD681 Organizational Development in Education
  • AD683 Leadership: Theories and Practices

Clinical and/or Instructional Supervision

  • AD662 Leadership, Supervision, and Professional Development

Curriculum Design

  • ED650 Curriculum Theories and Practices

Group Dynamics

  • AD674 Human Relations in School Management

School Law

  • AD668 The Law, the Courts, and the School

Practicum/Internship

  • AD687 Internship in Educational Leadership
    (Prerequisite: 15 credits of completed coursework)

Students may also complete the requirements for certification in administration and supervision by completing the Master of Arts (M.A.) in Curriculum and Instruction and then completing six additional credit hours as a special student (see Curriculum and Instruction ).

Certificate of Advanced Study (C.A.S.)

Advanced graduate work beyond the master's degree may be pursued in specific program areas. The 30-credit program leads to a Certificate of Advanced Study (C.A.S.). Requirements are 18 hours of coursework in a specific area of concentration and 12 hours of coursework in other areas. Students must meet with an advisor prior to beginning the program.

For information about the estimated costs, related standard occupations, and normal completion time for this program, visit www.loyola.edu/department/consumer-information.

EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY

Programs:

Master of Arts (M.A.) - 39 credits (includes 6 thesis credits)
Master of Education (M.Ed.) - 36 credits

Technology is playing an increasing role in our schools. Schools and districts are spending millions of dollars on technology, and leadership is needed to ensure that this investment is used to benefit education. Technology leaders must be masters of the change process as well as experts in the technology. The program integrates hands-on applications of educational technology with practical and theoretical perspectives of change, school reform, staff development, and ethical considerations of technology in the schools. Methods of infusing technology into the teaching and learning process will be modeled throughout the program.

This program is geared toward those wishing to expand their use of technology in their own classroom, as well as those wishing to become technology leaders on the school, district, and national levels.

Master of Education (M.Ed.)

Departmental Core (9 credits)

  • AD662 Leadership, Supervision, and Professional Development
  • ED600 Foundations of Research in Education or
  • ED670 Teacher Research and Inquiry
  • ED608 Educational Innovations

Technology Core (24 credits)

  • ET605 Introduction to Educational Technology
  • ET610 Curricular Applications of Technology
  • ET620 Multimedia Design in the Classroom
  • ET630 Digital Communication in the Classroom
  • ET631 Distance Education
  • ET641 Universal Design for Learning with Technology Integration
  • ET680 The Role of the Technology Leader
  • ET690 Educational Technology Seminar

Required Internship (3 credits)

  • ET691 Educational Technology Internship

Master of Arts (M.A.)

  • Departmental Core (9 credits)
  • Technology Core (24 credits)
  • ET699 Thesis Seminar (6 credits)

KODÁLY MUSIC EDUCATION

Program:

Master of Education (M.Ed.) - 36 credits

Purpose and Scope

The mission of the graduate program in Kodály Music Education is to meet the continuing educational needs of music educators by providing comprehensive graduate level teacher-training specializing in Kodály-based music education. The program applies the educational principles of the twentieth century Hungarian composer, ethnomusicologist, and educator, Zoltán Kodály (1882-1967). Deeply concerned about the quality of the musical training available to children and teachers in Hungary in the 1920s, he encouraged his colleagues and students to travel throughout Europe in search of the best models for teaching music. Their findings formed the basis for a comprehensive, child-developmental approach to music education that integrates the most effective and successful ideas, techniques, and tools for music instruction. Based on singing, it develops in students the ability to listen with understanding; perform with artistry; and read, write, improvise, and compose music. This approach is now known internationally as Kodály Music Education.

The program consists of coursework totaling 36 graduate credits and a research project to create a retrieval system of analyzed and categorized folk songs that support the Kodály curriculum. Coursework is divided into four levels with candidates completing nine (9) credits per level: three levels (27 credits) of music education and musicianship courses that confer Kodály certification, and a fourth level (9 credits) of education core courses designed to broaden the student's knowledge of research and trends in the field of education, as follows:

Solfa (6 credits)

  • KM860 Solfa: Sight Singing Ear Training, Level I
  • KM960 Solfa: Sight Singing Ear Training, Level II
  • KM995 Solfa: Sight Singing Ear Training, Level III

Kodály Methodology (6 credits)

  • KM852 Kodály Methodology, Level I
  • KM952 Kodály Methodology, Level II
  • KM994 Kodály Methodology, Level III

Kodály Materials (9 credits)

  • KM853 Kodály Materials, Level I
  • KM953 Kodály Materials, Level II
  • KM993 Kodály Materials, Level III

Choral Studies (6 credits)

  • KM856 Choral Studies for the Music Educator, Level I
  • KM956 Choral Studies for the Music Educator, Level II
  • KM992 Choral Studies for the Music Educator, Level III
  • Education Core Courses (9 credits)

    • ED600 Foundations of Research in Education
    • ED900 Advanced Study in Music Education
    • SE769 Teaching Students with Special Needs in the Regular Classroom or
    • SE800 Teaching Students with Special Needs in the Music Class

    This program is offered in a multi-summer format only. Level I, II, and III courses run for three weeks during the month of July. Education core courses for Level IV students vary in length and run for a total of three or four weeks, depending upon faculty availability. Students generally complete their four levels during four consecutive summers. Based on a proficiency test, some students are required to complete a Pre-Level I course called Solfa Fundamentals (KM590) to prepare them for Solfa I. This course runs during the week immediately preceding the M.Ed. courses. Solfa Fundamentals is a preparatory course and is not counted among the 36 credits required to complete the degree.

    The Kodály program requires an orientation weekend, a full schedule of classes during the day, Friday evening classes and activities, and several hours of practice and homework in the evenings and on the weekends. It is essential that students clear their schedules of other activities while participating in the summer institute. Candidates will submit video recordings of their teaching that demonstrate application of Kodály pedagogy; create teaching strategies and lesson plans for each grade level; and produce a retrieval system of songs for teaching that is both research-based and of continuing practical value in the classroom.

    SCHOOL COUNSELING

    Programs:

    Master of Arts (M.A.) - 48 credits
    Master of Education (M.Ed.) - 48 credits
    Certificate of Advanced Study (C.A.S.) - 30 credits beyond master's degree

    The graduate program in school counseling prepares students for careers as professional school counselors who work in elementary and/or secondary settings. Throughout the course of study, students have the opportunity to develop a sound theoretical foundation and acquire effective techniques for counseling school-aged youth. Upon successful completion of the program, students are eligible for state certification as a school counselor. In addition to schools, various public and private agencies outside of the educational field are interested in obtaining the services of counselors.

    The course of instruction involves the successful completion of 48 credits of study on the graduate level, including a practicum of 100 hours and an internship of 600 hours. Students must take a minimum of six elective credits in counseling, and all electives must be approved by the advisor. The 600-hour internship maybe completed in one semester (GC728), two semesters (GC722, GC723), or four semesters (GC730, GC731).

    All clinical experience students are required to complete criminal background checks prior to beginning work at a school site. All students are required to have valid background checks on file for the duration of their experience. Procedures and fees for this process may vary slightly depending upon clinical experience site. More information on this process will be given to students as they apply for practicum and internship.

    • GC600 Research and Evaluation in Counseling
    • GC606 Tests and Measurements
    • GC700 Introduction to School Counseling
    • GC701 Techniques of Counseling
    • GC703 Lifestyle and Career Development and Decision Making
    • GC704 Theories of Counseling
    • GC706 Group Counseling in Schools
    • GC708 Cross Cultural Counseling
    • GC712 Human Development through the Life Span
    • GC755 Marriage and Family Counseling
    • GC791 School Counseling Practicum
    • GC792 Professional Issues and Ethics in Counseling
    • Internship (600 hours; 6 credits)
    • Electives (6 credits)

    Students seeking a Master of Arts (M.A.) in School Counseling must substitute the six elective credits for thesis credits. For additional information, visit the School of Education's website.

    Master’s Comprehensive Examination

    A candidate’s mastery of course content is assessed near the end of the candidate's program using a comprehensive examination. The examination is given twice a year in March and November and each candidate must pass it in order to graduate. Degree candidates must request and complete an application to sit for the examination. Applications can be obtained by contacting the school counseling program director. A candidate may take the comprehensive exam no sooner than one semester before the semester the candidate is scheduled to graduate. No candidate may take the examination more than three times. Students who can show documentation that they are a Licensed Professional Counselor (LCPC) are not required to take the Counselor Preparation Comprehensive Examination (CPCE).

    This program has been approved by the Maryland State Department of Education using recognized state or national standards. The program is accredited by the Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP).

    Certificate of Advanced Study (C.A.S.)

    Advanced graduate work beyond the master's degree is provided in an organized, 30-credit program that leads to a Certificate of Advanced Study (C.A.S.). Special arrangements for course selection will be made in conjunction with a student's advisor.

    Requirements are as follows:

    • A minimum of 12 hours of coursework in school counseling.
    • As many as 12 hours of coursework in other areas of education.
    • As many as six hours of elective coursework in any area of graduate study. Internships may be suggested.

    For information about the estimated costs, related standard occupations, and normal completion time for this program, visit www.loyola.edu/department/consumer-information.

    SPECIAL EDUCATION

    Programs:

    Master of Education (M.Ed.), Early Childhood Special Education (Birth to Age 8) - 39 credits and prerequisites (as needed)
    Master of Education (M.Ed.), Elementary/Middle Special Education (Grades 1-8) - 39 credits and prerequisites (as needed)
    Master of Education (M.Ed.), Secondary Special Education (Grades 6-12) - 39 credits and prerequisites (as needed)
    Certificate of Advanced Study (C.A.S.) - 30 credits beyond master's degree

    The M.Ed. in Special Education can be used to meet requirements for initial certification in special education at the early childhood, elementary/middle, or secondary levels and is also appropriate for teachers seeking advanced professional development. These special education graduate programs prepare both beginning and advanced professionals with full qualifications to provide effective services to students with disabilities and to take leadership roles in the field of special education. The programs emphasize proven strategies, specialized instructional methods, legal issues, service delivery models, and advanced professional skills necessary to promote the provision of quality services to students with special needs.

    Loyola’s graduate degree and certificate programs in special education have been approved and accredited by the Maryland Higher Education Commission (MHEC), the Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE), the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), and the Council for Exceptional Children (CEC). The programs include the Maryland-approved reading courses and lead to eligibility for Maryland certification in special education at the corresponding age/grade level. Transcripts of program completers will indicate that they are eligible for certification in special education from a Maryland-approved licensure program using recognized state and national standards. This transcript stamp provides reciprocity with all other states and seven U.S. territories under the National Association of State Directors of Teacher Education and Certification Interstate Agreement (NASDTEC).

    Admission Criteria

    Students from a variety of academic backgrounds and careers are eligible to apply to the graduate programs in special education. Students do not need to complete the prerequisite requirements before applying and being accepted into the master’s programs. However, evidence of a passing score in each area of the Praxis I: Pre-Professional Skills Tests (Reading, Math, and Writing) is required for admission. Students may substitute qualifying scores on the SAT, ACT, or GRE for any area. An SAT score of 550 or more (500 if taken prior to April 1995) may be substituted for each corresponding area: reading, math, or writing. An ACT score of 24 in an area will substitute for the corresponding Praxis I area. Similarly, GRE scores of 500 verbal, 550 quantitative, and 4.5 on the writing essay may be substituted. Once accepted, each student will meet with an academic advisor to develop an individualized program plan of prerequisite and program courses and experiences.

    In accordance with the School of Education guidelines, a QPA of 3.000 in undergraduate coursework or master's degree from an accredited institution is required for full acceptance into the special education program. Students with a QPA of 2.750 to 3.000 may be given a provisional acceptance status. While letters of recommendation are not an overall requirement for this program, they may be requested for students who are being considered for provisional acceptance due to a QPA lower than 3.000.

    Detailed admission information (application procedures, required documents, deadlines, etc.) can be found under Admission.

    Prerequisite Courses/Experiences

    Prerequisite courses are intended to provide key foundational coursework and school experiences for all students, particularly those who are not currently certified in an area of education. Students may demonstrate completion of prerequisite coursework at the undergraduate or graduate level. Prerequisite experience with children with (and without) disabilities may be demonstrated through prior work or volunteer activities. If needed, students may participate in a supervised, school-based placement or complete requirements by teaching, volunteering, or serving in other capacities in regular and special education school programs. Observation and participation may be met through a variety of classroom experiences or through SE900. Students must demonstrate appropriate computer skills including word processing, internet usage, and database searching. These skills may be assessed through personal interview, hands-on demonstration, or product illustration. A noncredit computer workshop on uses of the internet and database searching may be provided for students.

    Students who have not completed the required coursework or mastered all of the prerequisite skills may be accepted into the program but will need to take the appropriate courses (or complete the appropriate experiences) before beginning program coursework. These courses do not count as credits completed toward the 39-credit degree requirement.

    Accelerated Master's Option

    The accelerated master’s option encompasses all of the components of the traditional Master of Education (M.Ed.) in Special Education within a concentrated period of time. Individuals who have already completed education programs, including the Maryland required reading courses, can complete the M.Ed. in four semesters (summer, fall, spring, summer) by carrying 9-12 credits each semester.

    Students who are interested in the accelerated master’s option should meet with an advisor one full semester before beginning the program in order to discuss course and placement options. Students are encouraged to seek full-time employment as an instructional assistant for the duration of the program. Loyola’s partnerships with local public and nonpublic schools provide paid positions as special education paraprofessionals and may provide some tuition remission.

    Required Examinations and Practicums

    Students must complete all coursework to be eligible for the practicum. Practicum placements involve intensive experiences and teaching in schools or other programs serving young children. Extended daytime availability is required. Students who are teaching may be eligible to complete one practicum experience in their own school. Practicums may also be scheduled in the summer to accommodate working students.

    Graduation

    In order to be eligible for graduation, students must complete all program requirements and passed the Praxis II pedagogy test in special education.

    M.Ed., Early Childhood Special Education (Birth to Age 8)

    Students in Loyola’s early childhood special education program are prepared to provide effective services to children with a wide variety of developmental delays or disabilities; to support families and teachers working with these children; and to take leadership roles in the field of early intervention. The program emphasizes proven strategies, collaboration techniques, assessment, early intervention methods, service delivery models, and advanced professional skills necessary to provide high-quality services to young children with special needs. A broad range of disabilities, medical conditions, sensory impairments, developmental disabilities, and severity levels are incorporated into the coursework and practicum experiences.

    The master's program in early childhood special education can be used to meet Maryland requirements for initial certification in special education for children from birth to age 8, and it is also appropriate for teachers seeking advanced professional development. The program attracts students from a variety of academic backgrounds and careers. Once accepted, students meet with an academic advisor to develop a personalized program plan of prerequisites, courses, and experiences based upon prior academic, teaching, and volunteer history. Program completion provides full teaching qualifications for effective service delivery to infants, toddlers, and preschoolers with disabilities. The program also prepares graduates to assume leadership roles in the field of early childhood special education.

    Prerequisite Courses/Experiences
    • RE760 Processes and Acquisition of Literacy
    • RE761 Materials for Teaching Reading
    • SE720 Child and Adolescent Development
    • SE761 Introduction to Special Education
    • SE900 Observation and Participation in Special Education
    • Observation and Participation in General Education
    • Technology Usage for Research and Writing
    Program Requirements

    Core Courses (18 credits)

    • ED600 Foundations of Research in Education
    • RE762 Assessment and Instruction in Reading I
    • RE763 Assessment and Instruction in Reading II
    • SE911 Assessment, Diagnosis, and Evaluation of Learning and Behavior Problems
    • SE912 Instructional Planning, Adaptations, and Learning Strategies for Students with Special Needs
    • SE913 Comprehensive Classroom Management for Teachers of Students with Special Needs

    Students who have completed Maryland’s required reading courses substitute the following courses for RE762 and RE763:

    • SE901 Advanced Behavioral Programming
    • SE921 Autism: Characteristics, Research, and Interventions

    Early Intervention Courses (15 credits)

    • SE922 Medical Aspects of Developmental Disabilities
    • SE923 Assessment and Intervention for Young Children with Special Needs: Birth through Age 2
    • SE924 Assessment and Intervention for Young Children with Special Needs (Focus: Ages 3-5)
    • SE925 Assessment and Intervention for Young Children with Special Needs (Focus: Ages 5-8)
    • SE926 Communication Development and Early Literacy: Materials, Resources, and Instructional Strategies (Focus: Birth to Age 5)

    Practicums (6 credits)

    • SE780 Practicum for Students with Special Needs (Infant/Toddler)
    • SE781 Practicum for Students with Special Needs (Preschool)

    It may be possible for students already working with young children with disabilities to complete one practicum at their current workplace. To be eligible to register for either practicum, students must demonstrate successful completion of the Praxis II Education of Exceptional Students: Core Content Knowledge test. To be eligible for graduation after completion of both practicums, students must demonstrate successful completion of the Praxis II Special Education: Application of Core Principles Across Categories of Disability test.

    M.Ed., Elementary/Middle Special Education (Grades

     1-8)

    Students in Loyola’s graduate programs in special education are prepared to provide effective services to children with a wide variety of disabilities and to take leadership roles in the field of special education. The programs emphasize proven strategies, specialized instructional methods, legal issues, comprehensive assessment, and advanced professional skills necessary to provide high-quality services to children and adolescents with special needs, particularly those with high-incidence disabilities such as language or learning disabilities, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorders, emotional/behavioral disorders, and mild cognitive impairments.

    The master's program in elementary/middle special education can be used to meet requirements for initial certification in generic special education (grades 1-8), and it is also appropriate for teachers seeking advanced professional development. The program attracts students from a variety of academic backgrounds and careers. Once accepted, students meet with an academic advisor to determine the need for prerequisite courses (if needed) or experiences and to develop a personalized program plan of courses based upon prior academic, teaching, and volunteer history. Program graduates are prepared to support the comprehensive needs of students in a variety of educational settings across the elementary and middle grades and to take leadership roles in the field of special education.

    Prerequisite Courses/Experiences
    • RE760 Processes and Acquisition of Literacy
    • RE761 Materials for Teaching Reading
    • SE720 Child and Adolescent Development
    • SE761 Introduction to Special Education
    • SE900 Observation and Participation in Special Education
    • Observation and Participation in General Education
    • Technology Usage for Research and Writing
    Program Requirements

    Coursework (33 credits)

    • ED600 Foundations of Research in Education
    • RE762 Assessment and Instruction in Reading I
    • RE763 Assessment and Instruction in Reading II
    • SE902 Reading Methods for Students with Mild and Moderate Disabilities
    • SE905 Characteristics of Learners with Mild and Moderate Disabilities
    • SE907 Developmental, Remedial, and Corrective Mathematics
    • SE909 Instruction in Elementary Content Areas for Students with Mild and Moderate Disabilities
    • SE911 Assessment, Diagnosis, and Evaluation of Learning and Behavior Problems
    • SE912 Instructional Planning, Adaptations, and Learning Strategies for Students with Special Needs
    • SE913 Comprehensive Classroom Management for Teachers of Students with Special Needs
    • SE914 Communication, Collaboration, and Consultation with Parents and Professionals Serving Students with Disabilities

    Students who have completed Maryland’s required reading courses substitute the following courses for RE762 and RE763:

    • SE901 Advanced Behavioral Programming
    • Elective (selected jointly with program advisor)

    Practicums (6 credits)

    • SE918 Practicum I: Teaching Students with Special Needs
    • SE919 Practicum II: Teaching Students with Special Needs

    It may be possible for students already working with young children with disabilities to complete one practicum at their current workplace. To be eligible to register for either practicum, students must demonstrate successful completion of the Praxis II Education of Exceptional Students: Core Content Knowledge test. To be eligible for graduation after completion of both practicums, students must demonstrate successful completion of the Praxis II Special Education: Application of Core Principles Across Categories of Disability test.

    M.Ed., Secondary Special Education (Grades 6-12)

    Students in Loyola’s secondary special education program are prepared to provide effective services to adolescents with disabilities, and to take leadership roles in the field of special education. The program emphasizes research-validated intervention techniques, specialized methods, comprehensive assessment, transition planning, and advanced professional skills necessary for providing quality services to adolescents with special needs, particularly those with high-incidence disabilities such as language or learning disabilities, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorders, emotional/ behavioral disorders, and mild mental retardation.

    This program meets Maryland requirements for initial certification in special education for adolescents in grades 6-12. The program attracts students from a variety of academic backgrounds and careers. Once accepted, students meet with an academic advisor to develop a personalized program plan of prerequisites (if needed), courses, and experiences based upon prior academic, teaching, and volunteer history. Program graduates are prepared to support the comprehensive needs of students in a variety of educational settings across the elementary and middle grades and to take leadership roles in the field of special education.

    Prerequisite Courses/Experiences
    • RE733 Teaching Reading in the Content Area I
    • RE744 Teaching Reading in the Content Area II
    • SE720 Child and Adolescent Development
    • SE761 Introduction to Special Education
    • SE900 Observation and Participation in Special Education
    • Observation and Participation in General Education
    • Technology Usage for Research and Writing
    Program Requirements

    Coursework (33 credits)

    • ED600 Foundations of Research in Education
    • SE901 Applied Behavioral Programming
    • SE902 Reading Methods for Students with Mild and Moderate Disabilities
    • SE905 Characteristics of Learners with Mild and Moderate Disabilities
    • SE907 Developmental, Remedial, and Corrective Mathematics
    • SE911 Assessment, Diagnosis, and Evaluation of Learning and Behavior Problems
    • SE912 Instructional Planning, Adaptations, and Learning Strategies for Students with Special Needs
    • SE913 Comprehensive Classroom Management for Teachers of Students with Special Needs
    • SE914 Communication, Collaboration, and Consultation with Parents and Professionals Serving Students with Disabilities
    • SE916 Promoting Successful Transitions to Postsecondary Settings for Students with Mild and Moderate Disabilities
    • SE917 Instruction in Secondary Content Areas for Students with Mild and Moderate Disabilities

    Practicums (6 credits)

    • SE918 Practicum I: Teaching Students with Special Needs
    • SE919 Practicum II: Teaching Students with Special Needs

    It may be possible for students already working with children with disabilities in an approved school and at the correct age/grade level to complete one practicum at their current workplace. To be eligible to register for either practicum, students must demonstrate successful completion of Praxis II Education of Exceptional Students: Core Content Knowledge test. To be eligible for graduation after completion of both practicums, students must demonstrate successful completion of Praxis II Special Education: Application of Core Principles across Categories of Disability test.

    Certificate of Advanced Study (C.A.S.)

    Advanced graduate work beyond the master's degree may be pursued in specific program areas. The 30-credit program leads to a Certificate of Advanced Study (C.A.S.) for students who have already completed a master's degree in special education. Requirements are 18 hours of coursework in special education and 12 hours of coursework in another area. The C.A.S. can be used for advanced professional development or to obtain a second special education certification for those already certified at one age/grade level. Students must meet with an advisor prior to beginning the program.

    For information about the estimated costs, related standard occupations, and normal completion time for this program, visit www.loyola.edu/department/consumer-information.

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