2013 - 2014
Graduate Catalogue

Psychology

Office: Beatty Hall, Room 220

Telephone: 410-617-2696

Website: www.loyola.edu/psychology

FACULTY

Chair: Beth A. Kotchick, Associate Professor

Associate Chair: Jeffrey Barnett, Professor

Director of Clinical Training: Heather Z. Lyons

Division Director, Behavioral Health and Assessment Services, The Loyola Clinical Centers: Mary Jo Coiro

Director of Doctoral Field Education: Angelita Yu

Director of Master's Education, Thesis Track: Martin F. Sherman

Director of Master's Education, Practitioner Track: Jeffrey Barnett

Interim Director of Master's Field Education: Katie J. Loomis

Director of Master's Plus and C.A.S. Programs: Anthony Parente

Professors: Jeffrey Barnett; Faith D. Gilroy (emerita); Jeffrey M. Lating; Martin F. Sherman; Amanda McCombs Thomas

Associate Professors: Carolyn McNamara Barry; David G. Crough (emeritus); Sharon Green-Hennessy; Rachel L. Grover; Matthew W. Kirkhart; Beth A. Kotchick; Charles T. LoPresto; Jen L. Lowry; Heather Z. Lyons; Alison A. Papadakis; Steven A. Sobleman (emeritus)

Assistant Professors: Marianna E. Carlucci; Mary Jo Coiro; Theresa DiDonato; Frank Golom; Christopher I. Higginson; Michiko Iwasaki; Adanna J. Johnson; Jason Prenoveau

Clinical Faculty: Katie J. Loomis; Tamra A. Shockley; Angelita M. Yu

Affiliate Faculty: George S. Everly, Jr.; Anthony Parente


The original graduate program in psychology began in 1967 as a concentration in school psychology within the Education Department and led to the Master of Education (M.Ed.). In 1968 the Psychology Department was created, and the program expanded to offer the Master of Arts (M.A.) in Psychology. In 1971, the department developed a Master of Science (M.S.) in Psychology. In 1996, the Doctor of Psychology (Psy.D.) in Clinical Psychology was introduced. The department currently offers degree programs in the following areas:

  • M.S. in Clinical Psychology, Thesis Track
  • M.S. in Clinical Psychology, Practitioner Track
  • M.S. in Counseling Psychology, Thesis Track
  • M.S. in Counseling Psychology, Practitioner Track
  • C.A.S. in Psychology
  • Master's Plus Program: Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor (LCPC) Courses
  • Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology

Loyola's degree programs in clinical and counseling psychology provide training to those who wish to promote mental health in individuals, families, organizations, and communities through careers in direct service, leadership, research, and education. The Psychology Department strives to provide a learning environment that facilitates the development of skills in critical thinking, assessment and intervention, and one that is grounded in an appreciation for both psychological science and human diversity.

The Psychology Department is a member of the Council of Applied Master's Programs in Psychology and a member of the National Council of Schools and Programs of Professional Psychology.

MASTER OF SCIENCE (M.S.) IN CLINICAL OR COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY

Mission

The M.S. in Clinical or Counseling Psychology provides training to individuals who wish to promote mental health in individuals, families, organizations, and communities through careers in direct service, leadership, research, and education. The programs strive to provide a learning environment that facilitates the development of skills in critical thinking, assessment, and intervention and one that is grounded in an appreciation for both psychological science and human diversity. Students seeking a master's degree in clinical or counseling psychology may choose to enter either the thesis track or the practitioner track.

The thesis track program prepares students to continue on to a doctoral degree program or establish a career as a research coordinator or program manager in applied or basic social science. Students receive training in psychological theory, assessment, intervention, and research application. An empirical thesis is required for completion of the program. Many thesis track graduates have continued their training in clinical, counseling, developmental, applied social, and industrial/organizational psychology Ph.D. programs.

The practitioner track program prepares students to begin employment in psychology under the supervision of a doctoral trained and licensed psychologist. In addition, some practitioner track students apply to Psy.D. programs of study, since these programs attract students who have a background in practicum and internship experiences, as opposed to research and thesis requirements.

Individuals with a master's degree are not eligible to practice independently as psychologists in Maryland but can function as psychology associates under supervision or continue their studies toward eligibility as a Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor (LCPC). Psychology associates provide services under the supervision of a licensed, doctoral-level psychologist with permission from the Maryland Board of Examiners of Psychologists. In the state of Maryland, the LCPC must meet the criteria set forth by the Maryland Board of Examiners of Professional Counselors and Therapists, including specific coursework as determined by the Board, 60 graduate credit hours, at least two years of supervised postgraduate experience, and successful completion of an exam administered by the Board. The LCPC is eligible to provide services independently in the state of Maryland.

Goals

Goal 1: Students will exhibit ethical behavior in professional settings, in keeping with the Ignatian tradition of care for the person, i.e., cura personalis.

Goal 2: Students will employ a scholarly, scientific approach to generating knowledge, resolving problems, and enhancing the development of individuals and groups.

Goal 3: Students will appreciate and understand a variety of professional assessment strategies and effectively use a selected set of assessment instruments.

Goal 4: Students will effectively conceptualize psychological issues and implement intervention strategies in resolving a problem or enhancing the development of individuals or groups.

Admission Criteria

Applicants for the M.S. in Clinical or Counseling Psychology should have a strong undergraduate academic background in psychology. Students must have a bachelor's degree in psychology or another field. The applicant's bachelor's degree must be from an accredited college or university with a minimum overall grade point average of 3.000 and a grade point average of 3.000 in psychology courses. If the bachelor's degree is in a field other than psychology, the following minimum prerequisite coursework must have been completed at the undergraduate level: introductory psychology, psychopathology, and at least one course relating to the experimental or statistical areas of social science, such as experimental psychology, research methods, psychological statistics, or tests and measurement. All of these courses must have been offered through a social sciences department (e.g., psychology, sociology, etc.).

Detailed admission information (application procedures, required documents, deadlines, etc.) can be found under Admission.

Program Requirements

Students who are accepted for admission to the master's program must attend an in-person orientation and registration session prior to the semester in which they first enroll. All new students have online access to the Student Handbook describing program requirements and departmental policies.

The M.S. in Clinical or Counseling Psychology requires 48 graduate credits and allows students to petition to complete a 60-credit degree (see Extended Master's Option). Students may enroll full- or part-time. Full-time students usually complete nine credits per semester (six credits for summer), while part-time students complete six or less credits per semester.

The practice and professions of clinical and counseling psychology are dynamic, evolving, and ever changing. The skills and techniques used are constantly being refined. As our understanding grows, the profession itself changes.

As human service professionals, it is important that Loyola graduates use only the most up-to-date knowledge and skills in clinical and counseling psychology. For these reasons, master's students must complete all requirements for their particular program within six years, including courses, the thesis track thesis, the practitioner and thesis track externships, and comprehensive exams. Additionally, it is expected that graduates will maintain and update their knowledge and skills through ongoing professional development and continuing education activities.

Master's Comprehensive Examination

Information on the specific courses deemed necessary to sit for the comprehensive exam for each of the degree programs (and their respective tracks) is described in the Master's Student Handbook, which is available online to all current students. Students must complete these courses before they are eligible to apply for the comprehensive exam. Students are not permitted to take the exam prior to completion of these courses.

The primary function of the comprehensive exam is to ensure that students have the competency and knowledge base to be independent practitioners of psychology. Students who have clearly demonstrated that competency in their classroom performance may be waived from taking the comprehensive exam. In order to qualify for a waiver from all sections of the exam, the courses must meet certain requirements, and students must meet both of the following criteria:

  1. Have a cumulative GPA of B+ (3.300) or better in the courses required by their track for comprehensive exams. (Note: This is not the overall GPA for all courses they have taken in the master's program.)
  2. Have a grade of B (3.000) or better in all courses required by their track for comprehensive exams.

Students who fail to meet the first criteria will be required to take and pass all sections of the comprehensive exam. Students who meet the first criteria, but fail to meet the second criteria, will be required to take and pass only the comprehensive exam section(s) associated with the courses in which they did not receive a B (3.000) or better.

The exam is given three times a year. Students must complete an Application for Comprehensive Examination available in the Psychology Department. The dates for the exam, as well as the deadline for application, are listed in the academic calendar on the Records website (www.loyola.edu/records). Students who are applying for a waiver must still complete an application, which will be reviewed to determine whether or not they meet the stated criteria for a waiver, and/or the sections of the exam they will be required to take and pass.

The exam consists of three sections (application and theory, ethics and diversity, and research) given over a two-day period. Exam scoring may vary according to the particular concentration. Students are required to pass the exam within the six-year time limit allowed to complete the degree. Students failing to pass any section on the third attempt will be dismissed from the program. More detailed information on the comprehensive exam process is available in the Master's Student Handbook.

Externships

The externship experience is an opportunity for students to apply concepts developed in academic coursework. Coordinated programs between the department and a variety of community resources have been established to fulfill student externship requirements and needs. The externship allows students to gain practical training and experience under the supervision of a mental health worker, clinician, or researcher in a community-based facility, hospital or other mental health setting.

The department maintains an extensive list of approved externship sites which meet the training requirements of the program. Students work with the director of field education and their advisor to select sites which are appropriate to their experiences and desired goals. All approved sites must be located within the state of Maryland or within close proximity to Maryland, including Washington, D.C., northern Virginia, or southern Pennsylvania.

The 300-hour externship is required for practitioner track students. Clinical practitioner students may not register for externships until they have completed a minimum of 18 credits including the following courses:

  • PY600 Assessment and Appraisal
  • PY603 Intellectual and Objective Personality Assessment
  • PY620 Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy
  • PY621 Principles and Practices in Psychotherapy with Lab

Counseling practitioner students may not register for externships until they have completed a minimum of 18 credits including PY620 and PY621. To register for an externship, all practitioner track students need the written permission of the director of field education.

Clinical and counseling practitioner students are strongly encouraged to complete Advanced Psychopathology (PY615) within the 18 credits required prior to being eligible for externship.

Thesis track students are required to take a 150-hour research externship. All thesis track students need the written permission of the director of master's education, thesis track.

Transfer credits for practicums or externships are not accepted. Students may complete a maximum of four externships for credit toward their degree requirements for the practitioner tracks. Thesis track students may complete a maximum of three externships toward their degree requirements.

Master's Thesis

The thesis required for all clinical and counseling thesis track students is a scientific investigation of publishable quality which demonstrates the scholarship, logical consistency, creativity, and comprehensiveness which are associated with genuine research. The idea for the master's thesis is initiated and developed by the student while enrolled in Research Methods in Psychology I and II (PY746, PY747). All thesis track students must enroll in PY746 and PY747 during the fall and spring semesters of their first year. After the first year, students have an opportunity to enroll in a research externship at an off-site facility. The research externship is a 10- to 12-hour per week applied research experience, and it enhances the students' doctoral application portfolios and job seeking opportunities.

Each thesis track student is responsible for seeking out a member of the faculty to serve as major reader for the thesis, as well as two other faculty members who will serve as readers on the Thesis Committee. A list of faculty members who serve as major readers is available from the department.

Registration for Thesis Guidance

Thesis Guidance I-IV (PY761, PY762, PY763, PY764) are taken with the three required research courses (PY746, PY747, PY791). A fee is charged each semester. During this time, students closely with their major readers in the development of the thesis proposal, the collection and analysis of data, and preparation of the final thesis. If the thesis is not completed by the end of the second year in the program, students must enroll in Thesis Guidance: Continuation (PY765) each semester (excluding summer sessions) until the thesis is completed. A fee is charged each semester.

It is anticipated that the major reader will work closely with the student during collection and analysis of data, and the student will incorporate the professor's suggestions in the completed thesis. Three copies of the final master's thesis, each signed by the committee members, are submitted to the department chair and the Dean of Loyola College for final approval. Copies of the guidelines for thesis procedures and style are available from the department upon request. The final copies of the completed thesis must be submitted at least three weeks before the end of the semester that a student expects to graduate.

Grading and Academic Dismissal

University-wide academic standards can be found in the section on Academic Standards and Dismissal under Academic Regulations and Policies.

In addition, students who receive a grade of less than B- (2.670) in any course will not be permitted to count this course for their degree. Students receiving a grade of less than B- in a required course must retake and successfully complete the course and are encouraged to meet with their advisor to discuss this issue. Both the original and retake grades remain on the student's transcript and will be calculated into the cumulative quality point average (QPA).

Students receiving a grade of less than B- in an elective course must meet with their advisor to determine if they should retake the same course or substitute an alternative elective. In either case, the original course grade remains on the student's transcript and is calculated into the cumulative quality point average.

It is the student's responsibility to make certain that the minimum QPA requirement of 3.000, which is a B average, is maintained. Students who fall below this level of achievement will be placed on academic probation for one semester, and must meet with their advisor to discuss their progress. Failure to raise the cumulative QPA to 3.000 in the following semester will result in dismissal from the program. Moreover, either the receipt of one F (0.000) or the accumulation of two grades of C+ (2.330) or lower also will result in dismissal from the program.

Academic dismissal may also result from excessive course withdrawal, academic dishonesty, or other unethical unprofessional conduct reflecting upon a student's ability to enter into the academic or professional field in which the degree is being offered. If the Psychology Department perceives that a student is not progressing satisfactorily in the development of the competencies and behaviors required at his or her level of professional development, a Professional Assessment Review (PAR) will be conducted for the purpose of remediation or dismissal.

Degree Programs

Students may view the Psychology Department website for suggested full- and part-time programs of study for the practitioner and research tracks.

M.S. in Clinical Psychology, Thesis Track

Excellent preparation for students planning to pursue a Ph.D. The focus of the degree is on research training and skills; however, the student also receives master's-level assessment and psychotherapy training with an emphasis on assessment. The degree consists of 48 graduate credit hours, successfully passed comprehensive examinations, and a completed and approved master's thesis. The following courses are required for graduation:

  • PY600 Assessment and Appraisal
  • PY603 Intellectual and Objective Personality Assessment
  • PY615 Advanced Psychopathology
  • PY620 Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy
  • PY621 Principles and Practices in Psychotherapy with Lab
  • PY700 Research Externship
  • PY705 Ethical, Legal, and Professional Issues in Counseling and Psychology
  • PY710 Diversity Issues in Psychology
  • PY715 Human Biopsychology
  • PY746 Research Methods in Psychology I
  • PY747 Research Methods in Psychology II
  • PY761 Thesis Guidance I (0 credits)
  • PY762 Thesis Guidance II (1 credit)
  • PY763 Thesis Guidance III (1 credit)
  • PY764 Thesis Guidance IV (1 credit)
  • PY791 Computer Analysis of Psychological Data
  • Elective
  • Elective
  • Elective
M.S. in Counseling Psychology, Thesis Track

Excellent preparation for students planning to pursue a Ph.D. The focus of the degree is on research training and skills; however, the student also receives master's-level assessment and psychotherapy training with an emphasis on psychotherapy. The degree consists of 48 graduate credit hours, successfully passed comprehensive examinations, and a completed and approved master's thesis. The following courses are required:

  • PY600 Assessment and Appraisal
  • PY615 Advanced Psychopathology
  • PY620 Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy
  • PY621 Principles and Practices in Psychotherapy with Lab
  • PY700 Research Externship
  • PY705 Ethical, Legal, and Professional Issues in Counseling and Psychology
  • PY710 Diversity Issues in Psychology
  • PY715 Human Biopsychology
  • PY746 Research Methods in Psychology I
  • PY747 Research Methods in Psychology II
  • PY761 Thesis Guidance I (0 credits)
  • PY762 Thesis Guidance II (1 credit)
  • PY763 Thesis Guidance III (1 credit)
  • PY764 Thesis Guidance IV (1 credit)
  • PY791 Computer Analysis of Psychological Data
  • Elective
  • Elective
  • Elective
  • Elective
M.S. in Clinical Psychology, Practitioner Track

Prepares the student for mental health provider positions in public and private settings. The student receives master's-level training in assessment and psychotherapy with a focus on assessment. Additionally, the program may provide for preparation for certification or licensure as a mental health counselor or entrance into a Psy.D. program. The degree consists of 48 graduate credit hours, successfully passed comprehensive examinations, and a supervised externship. The following courses are required:

  • PY600 Assessment and Appraisal
  • PY603 Intellectual and Objective Personality Assessment
  • PY615 Advanced Psychopathology
  • PY620 Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy
  • PY621 Principles and Practices in Psychotherapy with Lab
  • PY622 Advanced Techniques of Counseling and Psychotherapy
  • PY702 Externship in Clinical Psychology I
  • PY703 Externship in Clinical Psychology II
  • PY705 Ethical, Legal, and Professional Issues in Counseling and Psychology
  • PY710 Diversity Issues in Psychology
  • PY715 Human Biopsychology
  • PY746 Research Methods in Psychology I
  • PY Assessment Elective
  • Elective
  • Elective
  • Elective
M.S. in Counseling Psychology, Practitioner Track

Prepares the student for mental health provider positions in public or private settings. The student receives master's-level training in assessment and psychotherapy with a focus on psychotherapy. The program may also provide for preparation for certification or licensure as a mental health counselor. The degree consists of 48 graduate credit hours, successfully passed comprehensive examinations, and a supervised externship. The following courses are required:

  • PY600 Assessment and Appraisal
  • PY615 Advanced Psychopathology
  • PY618 Group Therapy
  • PY620 Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy
  • PY621 Principles and Practices in Psychotherapy with Lab
  • PY622 Advanced Techniques of Counseling and Psychotherapy
  • PY624 Marriage and Family Therapy
  • PY639 Alcoholism and Other Drug Dependence: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Prevention
  • PY657 Lifestyle and Career Development
  • PY664 Advanced Developmental Psychology: Life Span
  • PY705 Ethical, Legal, and Professional Issues in Counseling and Psychology
  • PY710 Diversity Issues in Psychology
  • PY715 Human Biopsychology
  • PY731 Externship in Counseling Psychology I
  • PY732 Externship in Counseling Psychology II
  • PY746 Research Methods in Psychology I

Students completing the practitioner track of the counseling program satisfy at least 13 of the 14 required content areas for LCPC licensure from the Maryland Board of Examiners of Professional Counselors and Therapists. Students then have 12 credits remaining to satisfy the 60-credit, LCPC educational requirements. They may satisfy the additional 12 credits of counseling electives through enrollment in the Extended Master's Option, or by applying to either the Master's Plus or C.A.S. programs after completing the 48 credit master's program. Students are also eligible to request information from and apply to the Board for LCPC-G (Graduate) status after completing the 60 credits. Requirements vary by state.

Extended Master's Option

Pursuing a 60-credit master's degree may be particularly beneficial for students who are planning to obtain licensure as a professional counselor, as it is a requirement for license eligibility in many states. In order to meet this need, the department offers a 12-credit elective option for all master's students. This option must be taken in addition to the 48 credits required for the M.S., and these courses may not serve in lieu of other electives.

After completing 21 hours in their regular concentration, but prior to completing 30 credits, students must apply in writing to be considered for this option. Application does not guarantee enrollment, as currently matriculating psychology students are given first priority for enrollment in the required courses for their degree program. Once accepted into the extended master's option, students must complete all 60 credits in order to receive their degree.

Students who do not choose to complete the 60-credit master's degree may complete the 48-credit degree and obtain the additional courses required for master's-level licensure through enrollment in the Certificate of Advanced Study (C.A.S.) or Master's Plus programs.

CERTIFICATE OF ADVANCED STUDY (C.A.S.)

The C.A.S. program provides those students who possess a master's degree in psychology or an allied profession with an opportunity to advance their knowledge and skills in the area of clinical and counseling psychology. Students will take advantage of the opportunity to "tailor" courses to meet specialized job and certification requirements. Students will meet with an academic advisor to arrange for a sequencing of courses to meet their needs. In the past, students have pursued the program to meet credentialing requirements in the areas of family treatment, clinical mental health counselor, etc. Current course offerings include many of those which are required by the Maryland Board of Examiners of Professional Counselors and Therapists to become a Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor (LCPC).

The certificate consists of 30 graduate credits beyond the master's degree. No more than 6 credits may be taken outside of the Psychology Department. The student is not required to take comprehensive examinations or write a thesis. C.A.S. applicants do not need to submit Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores. For information about the estimated costs, related standard occupations, and normal completion time for this program, visit www.loyola.edu/department/consumer-information.

Goals

Goal 1: Students will effectively conceptualize psychological issues and implement intervention strategies in resolving a problem or enhancing the development of individuals or groups.

Goal 2: Students will appreciate and understand a variety of professional assessment strategies that they may effectively use in their clinical or counseling practice.

Goal 3: Students will exhibit ethical behavior in a professional setting in keeping with the Ignatian tradition of care for the person, i.e. cura personalis.

Goal 4: Students will advance their knowledge of and skills with the areas of psychological assessment, treatment, and prevention of mental, emotional, and behavior problems, as dictated by their individual professional needs.

MASTER'S PLUS PROGRAM

Students who possess a master's degree from Loyola University Maryland or another accredited institution may take the specific courses required by the Maryland Board of Examiners of Professional Counselors and Therapists to become a Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor (LCPC). Students must be officially admitted to the program before they will be allowed to register for courses. Advising and course approval are provided by departmental faculty and the director of clinical and counseling field education. No more than six (6) credits may be taken outside of the Psychology Department. Master's Plus students are not required to take comprehensive examinations or write a thesis. Master's Plus applicants do not need to submit Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores.

Goals

Goal 1: Students will effectively conceptualize psychological issues and implement intervention strategies in resolving a problem or enhancing the development of individuals or groups.

Goal 2: Students will appreciate and understand a variety of professional assessment strategies that they may effectively use in their clinical or counseling practice.

Goal 3: Students will exhibit ethical behavior in a professional setting in keeping with the Ignatian tradition of care for the person, i.e. cura personalis.

Goal 4: Students will advance their knowledge of and skills with the areas of psychological assessment, treatment, and prevention of mental, emotional, and behavior problems, as dictated by their individual professional needs.

DOCTOR OF PSYCHOLOGY (Psy.D.) IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY

Mission

The Psychology Department is committed to the professional training and development of doctoral level psychologists in the Ignatian tradition of cura personalis, which challenges students to serve and lead others in service.

The goals and objectives of the Psy.D. program exist within the larger context of professional psychology, the principles of the American Psychological Association, and the mission of Loyola University Maryland. The development of these goals and objectives was guided by the six original competencies adopted by the National Council of Schools and Programs in Professional Psychology (NCSPP, 1986-87 Mission Bay Conference); the recently adopted diversity competency (NCSPP, 2002 Chicago Conference); the Jesuit tradition of leadership and service; and the department's own mission and philosophy of training.

The NCSPP competencies of relationship (i.e., professional and interpersonal demeanor), intervention, and assessment form the basis for the first three goals. The NCSPP competency of research, the "scholar" dimension of the "scholar-practitioner" model of training, and the department's commitment to scholarly inquiry across all activities in professional psychology, form the basis for the fourth goal. The NCSPP competencies of consultation/education and supervision guide the development of the fifth and sixth goals.

These goals are based on the department's commitment to training students to adapt to the diverse and changing needs in professional psychology, its recognition psychologists will function increasingly outside of their traditional roles, and its model of training in which students are encouraged to develop unique professional identities. Given their salience, pervasiveness, relevance, and the departmentís commitment to both, the objectives and competencies of ethics and diversity are integrated within each of the six goals.

The program's philosophy, educational model, and curriculum plan are consistent with the mission of Loyola University Maryland and the graduate division. They are also consistent with the following principles of the discipline:

  • Psychological practice is based on the science of psychology which, in turn, is influenced by the practice of professional psychology.
  • Training is sequential, cumulative, graded in complexity, and designed to prepare students for further organized training.
Philosophy of Training

The members of the Psychology Department are committed to providing students with a strong background in clinical psychology and to training students to understand and adapt to the diverse and changing needs in professional psychology. Training will combine a foundation of knowledge of the field with the skills necessary for a systematic approach to answering questions, resolving problems, and enhancing the development of individuals and groups, as well as promotion of the values and attitudes consistent with the practice of professional psychology. This training is built upon excellence in didactic and experiential methods of teaching and supportive mentoring relationships.

Model of Professional Training

The Psy.D. program endorses the "scholar-practitioner model" which is designed to train autonomous practitioners of professional psychology who will deliver mental health services and lead others in service to the general public in diverse settings. In addition, the program is designed to train psychologists who will critically evaluate and use the available literature in the field and who will use a scholarly approach, often in collaboration with others, to solving problems and answering questions at the local level.

The Psy.D. program is committed to a professional development model of training in which each student is encouraged to develop a unique professional identity consistent with the individual's own values, style, and philosophy. Within this framework, the program promotes the integration of theoretical and empirical literature in all types of professional decision making. Investigation of varying theoretical models, interaction with diverse role models within the profession, and supervised experience in a broad range of models are encouraged.

The program is committed to training students in a generalist model. As suggested in the philosophy of training, the faculty believe it is essential that all graduates possess a strong base in the foundations (i.e., both content and methods) of clinical psychology regardless of the extent to which they choose to specialize within the field. To support that base, each student receives training in a minimum of three theoretical models. The faculty espouse different theoretical models; therefore, most students receive training in a variety of them, including cognitive, behavioral, psychodynamic, family systems, and interpersonal psychotherapies. All students receive training and clinical experience in empirically validated therapies. In addition, students pursue training in a variety of clinical settings with populations who vary in age, ethnic and racial identity, sexual orientation, and socioeconomic status.

Goals

The proximal goals that specify the competencies expected of graduates of the Psy.D. program are as follows:

Goal 1: As service providers, colleagues, and aspiring leaders, students will form and maintain relationships with a sensitivity and awareness of professional and interpersonal demeanor.

Goal 2: Students will competently and effectively use a variety of intervention strategies that expose them to evidence-based treatments and outcomes.

Goal 3: Students will competently and effectively use a variety of assessment strategies, with an appreciation of their value, psychometric properties, and respect for ethics and diversity.

Goal 4: Students will be exposed to the theory and practice of supervision.

Goal 5: Students will exposed to the theory and practice of consultation.

Goal 6: Students will employ a scholarly, scientific approach to generating knowledge, addressing problems, and enhancing the development of the field through their research.

Accreditation

The Psy.D. Program in Clinical Psychology offered through the Department of Psychology is accredited with the American Psychological Association (APA) Commission on Accreditation (CoA), 750 First Street NE, Washington DC 20002-4242, 202-336-5500.

Admission Criteria

Admission to the Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology is limited to a highly select group of students who have a proven competency in psychology through a strong academic background. The successful applicant will have received either a bachelor's or master's degree from an accredited institution and obtained at least an overall 3.000 grade point average (out of 4.000) at the undergraduate level of study or an overall 3.200 (out of 4.000) grade point average at the graduate level of study. Applications are considered for fall admission only. The completed application will be reviewed and evaluated by teams of psychology faculty members, and a decision will be communicated via e-mail to the applicant.

Students who are accepted for the Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology and have only completed a bachelor's degree in psychology will be expected to complete four years of full-time study plus an additional full-time internship year. Students who have completed a master's degree in clinical psychology may only be required to complete three years of full-time academic study plus an additional full-time internship year.

Admittance to the doctoral program in psychology is contingent upon passing a criminal background check. Each student recommended for admission into the program will be required to obtain, pay for, and pass a criminal background check. These background checks are routinely required by the Loyola Clinical Centers, schools, hospitals, and other agencies that participate in the clinical education of Loyola students. Failure to pass a criminal background check may make a student ineligible to complete requirements and result in revocation of the student's acceptance into the graduate program. Additional information regarding the criminal background check process will be included in the acceptance letter.

Detailed admission information (application procedures, required documents, deadlines, etc.) can be found under Admission.

Prerequisites

All applicants to the Psy.D. program must have a minimum of a bachelor's degree in psychology or another field. Applicants must have competence in the following areas of psychology: general psychology, social psychology, psychopathology, personality theory, statistics and/or research methods, tests and measurements, and learning theory or cognitive psychology. Students who apply with a bachelor's degree should have completed coursework in each of these areas, whether their degree is in Psychology or another field. Students entering the program with a master's degree may be eligible to begin the program at the second year of the curriculum, if they have completed graduate coursework that is equivalent to the required curriculum listed for the first year of the program.

The above mentioned prerequisite courses are not only essential for readiness for doctoral study, but it is important to note that an outcome goal of the program is to adequately prepare the student for success in passing the National Licensure Examination in Psychology. A solid preparation in the breadth of psychology is essential for assisting the student in meeting this goal.

Credits Required

The doctoral program requires the completion of 126 credits for those students entering the first year of the curriculum and 93 credits for those students entering the second year of the curriculum (with a master's degree in clinical psychology), including credits earned for coursework, clinical placements, professional supervision, and dissertation. Students are also required to complete a full-time internship in the fifth year of the program. All requirements for the Psy.D. program, including the dissertation and internship, must be completed within seven years of enrollment in the program. This necessitates that students apply for the internship no later than the fall of their sixth academic year.

Student Evaluation

The awarding of the doctoral degree requires successful completion of all required coursework, clinical placements, internship, and dissertation, as well as passing comprehensive exams.

Grades and Academic Dismissal

University-wide academic standards can be found in the section on Academic Standards and Dismissal under Academic Regulations and Policies.

In addition, students who receive a grade of less than B- (2.670) in any course will not be permitted to count this course for their degree. Students receiving a grade of less than B- in a required course must retake and successfully complete the course, and are encouraged to meet with their advisor to discuss this issue. Both the original and retake grades remain on the student's transcript and will be calculated into the cumulative quality point average (QPA).

Students receiving a grade of less than B- in an elective course must meet with the advisor to determine if they should retake the same course or substitute an alternative elective. In either case, the original course grade remains on the student's transcript and is calculated into the cumulative QPA.

It is the student's responsibility to make certain that the minimum QPA requirement of 3.000, which is a B average, is maintained. Students who fall below this level of achievement will be placed on academic probation for one semester, and must meet with their advisor to discuss their progress. Failure to raise the cumulative QPA to 3.000 in the following semester will result in dismissal from the program. Moreover, either the receipt of one F (0.000) or the accumulation of two grades of C+ (2.330) or lower also will result in dismissal from the program.

Academic dismissal may also result from excessive course withdrawal, academic dishonesty, or other unethical unprofessional conduct reflecting upon a student's ability to enter into the academic or professional field in which the degree is being offered. If the Psychology Department perceives that a student is not progressing satisfactorily in the development of the competencies and behaviors required at his or her level of professional development, a Professional Assessment Review (PAR) will be conducted for the purpose of remediation or dismissal.

Evaluation and Review

Each semester, the Psychology Department conducts a Psy.D. Professional Standards (PPS) evaluation for all Psy.D. students, evaluating their professional development in specific domains. Students also engage in self-evaluation. Students then meet with their advisors to discuss the results of the PPS. If significant concerns are raised about a student's professional development, the director of clinical training may appoint a Professional Assessment Review (PAR) Committee to meet with the student to discuss those concerns and provide recommendations for remediation.

Comprehensive Examinations

In order to remain in the program, students are given three attempts to pass two doctoral comprehensive exams. The written doctoral comprehensive exam assesses knowledge and integration of material relevant to clinical psychology. The doctoral clinical oral competency exam assesses case conceptualization and oral presentation skills.

Dissertation

The doctoral dissertation requires the student to demonstrate a sound understanding of an area of professional interest and provide a scholarly contribution that may be of an applied nature. It is expected that the dissertation includes an extensive review of theory and previous research. An oral presentation of the proposal and an oral presentation and defense of the finished dissertation are required. The doctoral dissertation may consist of:

  • the implementation and evaluation of a clinical intervention or training program, or evaluation of a preexisting program;
  • a needs assessment, followed by a model for implementation;
  • empirical or theoretical analysis of aspects of a model of psychopathology;
  • the development and/or evaluation of an assessment instrument;
  • the implementation and evaluation of an intervention technique using single case design methodology.

Case studies may be used in conjunction with one of these approved categories of dissertation research, but may not stand alone as a project.

Clinical Placement and Internship

The clinical placement and internship experience are integral components of the student's academic experience. Through these supervised experiences, students are afforded an opportunity to apply skills and techniques acquired from assessment and intervention-oriented course material. Students are supervised on-site by licensed psychologists. Clinical placement facilities have been carefully chosen by the department for the quality of their training experiences and supervision. Students also participate in group consultation and professional development on campus.

A minimum of 1,410 clinical placement hours are completed in the first four years of the program; students who enter the program in the second year of the curriculum complete a minimum of 1,260 hours in their second through fourth years. In either case, about 25 percent of the total placement hours involve direct client contact/intervention. The fifth year of the curriculum is a full-time internship, for which a student applies during the fourth year. The internship year may or may not be spent in the local area.

The Loyola Clinical Centers is the training clinic for the Psychology Department. Under the divisions of Behavioral Health and Assessment Service and the Multidisciplinary Assessment Center, doctoral students have a wide range of training opportunities: child, adolescent, and adult therapy; individual, couples, family, and group therapy; and assessment. Located at Belvedere Square (approximately one mile from the Baltimore Campus), The Loyola Clinical Centers is a multispecialty clinic offering a wide range of services to the Baltimore community.

Colloquium

Each semester, a time period is designated for the scheduling of presentations by community professionals, faculty, or other students on varying topics relevant to professional psychology. Students also attend group meetings each semester with the director of doctoral education or other faculty to discuss their progress and needs in the program.

Program of Study

Students entering the program with a master's degree in psychology may be eligible to begin their studies at the second year of the curriculum. The following course schedule applies to those students entering the program Fall 2013 or later. Students entering the program prior to this time should refer to the curriculum schedule for their particular class.

First Year

Fall Term

    PY601 Cognitive Assessment
    PY615 Advanced Psychopathology
    PY620 Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy
    PY707 Introduction to Clinical Experiences: Adult Intake Rotation or
    PY708 Introduction to Clinical Experiences: Child and Adolescent Rotation
    PY810 Psychological Measurement
    PY912 Colloquium (0 credits)
    PY918 Professional Consultation and Development (2 credits)
    PY925 Clinical Applications Assessment (1 credit)

Spring Term

    PY602 Personality Assessment
    PY621 Principles and Practices in Psychotherapy with Lab
    PY707 Introduction to Clinical Experiences: Adult Intake Rotation or
    PY708 Introduction to Clinical Experiences: Child and Adolescent Rotation
    PY819 Historical and Philosophical Bases of Psychology
    PY832 Research Methods in Clinical Psychology I
    PY890 Dissertation Preparation (0 credits)
    PY912 Colloquium (0 credits)
    PY918 Professional Consultation and Development (2 credits)
    PY925 Clinical Applications Assessment (1 credit)

Second Year

Fall Term

    PY800 Professional, Legal, and Ethical Issues
    PY801 Principles of Objective Personality and Suicide Assessment
    PY870 Diversity Seminar
    PY891 Introduction to Dissertation I (0 credits)
    PY912 Colloquium (0 credits)
    PY918 Professional Consultation and Development (2 credits)
    PY920 Clinical Placement I (2 credits)
    PY925 Clinical Applications Assessment (1 credit)

Spring Term

    PY802 Principles and Methods of Assessment
    PY814 Biological Bases of Behavior or
    PY815 Psychopathology Seminar
    PY833 Research Methods and Data Analysis in Clinical Psychology II
    PY891 Introduction to Dissertation I (0 credits)
    PY912 Colloquium (0 credits)
    PY918 Professional Consultation and Development (2 credits)
    PY920 Clinical Placement I (2 credits)
    PY925 Clinical Applications Assessment (1 credit)

Third Year

Fall Term

    PY818 Psychopharmacology
    PY820 Cognitive and Affective Aspects of Behavior
    PY886 Advanced Topics in Professional Psychology #1
    PY892 Introduction to Dissertation II
    PY912 Colloquium (0 credits)
    PY918 Professional Consultation and Development (2 credits)
    PY921 Clinical Placement II

Spring Term

    PY813 Seminar on Social and Cultural Bases of Behavior
    PY842 Supervision Theory and Practice
    PY845 Models of Psychotherapy #1
    PY845 Models of Psychotherapy #2
    PY892 Introduction to Dissertation II (0 credits)
    PY912 Colloquium (0 credits)
    PY918 Professional Consultation and Development (2 credits)
    PY921 Clinical Placement II

Fourth Year

Fall Term

    PY816 Life Span Development
    PY886 Advanced Topics in Professional Psychology #2
    PY902 Clinical Dissertation I
    PY912 Colloquium (0 credits)
    PY918 Professional Consultation and Development (2 credits)
    PY922 Clinical Placement III

Spring Term

    PY845 Models of Psychotherapy #3
    PY886 Advanced Topics in Professional Psychology #3
    PY903 Clinical Dissertation II
    PY912 Colloquium (0 credits)
    PY918 Professional Consultation and Development (2 credits)
    PY922 Clinical Placement III

Fifth Year

Fall Term

    PY950 Clinical Internship I (0 credits)

Spring Term

    PY951 Clinical Internship II (0 credits)

LAB FACILITIES

Departmental facilities are available for research and clinical training experience. The Psychology Department also maintains a behavioral medicine laboratory for research and training. Additionally, computers are available for student research, with helpful tools such as SPSS, PsycINFO, and internet access.

ASSISTANTSHIPS

The Psychology Department has a limited number of teaching and/or research assistantships available for qualified graduate students. These assistantships typically include partial tuition remission and a stipend. Psychology assistantships are usually not available to students during their first semester of enrollment in the master's program or the first year of the Psy.D. curriculum. Students who are interested in such opportunities after their first semester may complete an application, available from the department secretary. Students who are interested in assistantships or employment in other departments on campus may contact the Human Resources Office for further information.

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