2013 - 2014
Undergraduate Catalogue

Sociology

Office: Beatty Hall, Room 314

Telephone: 410-617-2742

Website: www.loyola.edu/sociology

FACULTY

Chair: Mark F. Peyrot, Professor

Professors: Mark F. Peyrot; Jai P. Ryu (emeritus)

Associate Professors: M. Antonia Keane; Barbara H. Vann

Assistant Professors: Michelle I. Gawerc; Joshua D. Hendrick; H. Lovell Smith

Affiliate Faculty: Gisele Ferretto; Amanda Konradi; Jana Kopelentova-Rehak; Jill-Kristi Tyler


Sociology incorporates the dual traditions of the humanities and natural sciences in an effort to describe, understand, and explain human social behavior. Sociology addresses many of the great questions that humanists have posed with the attitude and methods of the natural sciences. Students of sociology develop a strong appreciation for history, philosophy, and the liberal arts in general, while learning to think scientifically and systematically. Students learn to apply basic sociological research techniques and skills, which graduates will find useful in a variety of career tracks. Many students are drawn to sociology because they are people-oriented and are considering a career in which they will require "people skills," such as law, business, medicine, teaching, government, nonprofit organizations, or social work.

Sociology majors and minors have a wide range of interesting and useful courses to choose from, and considerable freedom to design programs of study that match their academic and career goals. Because of its integrative, synthesizing nature and its emphasis on social research skills, sociology complements other disciplines, as in a double or interdisciplinary major.

LEARNING AIMS

Upon graduation, sociology majors will:

  • understand the discipline of sociology and its role in contributing to an understanding of social reality;
  • understand basic sociological concepts and their fundamental theoretical interrelations;
  • be able to think critically;
  • be able to write and speak clearly;
  • possess a keen sociological imagination;
  • understand the role of theory in sociology;
  • understand the role of evidence and qualitative and quantitative methods;
  • understand in depth at least two specialty areas in sociology;
  • understand the diversity of U.S. society and the place of the United States in international context;
  • understand the micro/macro distinction in sociology;
  • understand reciprocal relationships between individuals and society;
  • have developed a sociologically-informed appreciation of values.

MAJOR IN SOCIOLOGY

Bachelor of Arts

Requirements for a major and an example of a typical program of courses are as follows:

Freshman Year

Fall Term

    SC101 Self and Society* or
    SC102 Societies and Institutions*
    WR100 Effective Writing
    Fine Arts Core
    Language Core
    Nondepartmental Elective

Spring Term

    EN101 Understanding Literature
    HS101 Europe and the World Since 1500
    SC101 Self and Society* or
    SC102 Societies and Institutions*
    Language Core or
    Elective
    Math/Science Core

Sophomore Year

Fall Term

    PL201 Foundations of Philosophy
    SC342 Social Research Methods
    ST110 Introduction to Statistical Methods and Data Analysis*
    TH201 Introduction to Theology or
    Nondepartmental Elective
    English Core

Spring Term

    PL200-Level Philosophical Perspectives Course
    SC343 Survey and Design Analysis or
    SC344 Qualitative Sociological Inquiry or
    SC345 Social Work Methods*
    History Core
    Theology Core or
    Elective
    Sociology Elective*

Junior Year

Fall Term

    SC355 Sociological Theory*
    TH201 Introduction to Theology or
    Math/Science Core
    Sociology Elective* (SC360-499)
    Sociology Elective*
    Nondepartmental Elective

Spring Term

    Theology Core or
    Elective
    Sociology Elective* (SC360-499)
    Sociology Elective*
    Elective
    Elective

Senior Year

Fall Term

    SC400-Level Seminar*
    Ethics Core
    Elective
    Elective
    Elective

Spring Term

    SC401 Sociology Practicum and Seminar*
    Elective
    Elective
    Elective
    Elective

* Required for major.

  1. Major in Sociology: Twelve courses are required: SC101, SC102, SC342, SC343 or SC344 or SC345, SC355, SC401, three courses at the SC360-499 level (one of which must be a 400-level seminar), and three electives.
  2. Introduction to Statistical Methods and Data Analysis (ST110) or an equivalent statistics course (e.g., EC220) is required for the major. Introduction to Computers with Software Applications (CS111) is strongly recommended. ST110 and CS111 can be used to fulfill the mathematics/natural science core requirements.
  3. Interdisciplinary Major: Students wishing to combine sociology with some other field for an interdisciplinary major must take SC101, SC102, SC342, SC355, and four sociology electives, two of which must be SC360-499 level (and one of those must be a 400-level seminar).
  4. The combination of biology/sociology is an excellent program of study for students interested in medical school, graduate study in medical sociology, or a career in the health field.

  5. Only SC100-level courses may be used to satisfy the social science core requirement.
  6. Prerequisites may be waived for any course upon receiving written permission of the instructor and the department chair.
  7. Students must complete the diversity core requirement through a designated diversity core, major, or elective course (see Diversity Core Requirement under Curriculum and Policies).

MINOR IN SOCIOLOGY

  • SC101 Self and Society
  • SC102 Societies and Institutions
  • Five additional sociology courses, one of which must be at the SC360-499 level.

© Loyola University Maryland. All rights reserved. Send comments or questions to the catalogues webmaster.