2013 - 2014
Undergraduate Catalogue

Fine Arts

Office: DeChiaro College Center, Room W035E

Telephone: 410-617-2031

Website: www.loyola.edu/finearts

FACULTY

Chair: Janet A. Headley, Professor

Professors: Janet A. Headley; Martha C. Taylor; Anthony D. Villa

Associate Professors: Mary Beth Akre; James R. Bunzli; James E. Dockery (emeritus); Janet Maher; Barnaby Nygren; Ronald Pearl; Daniel Schlapbach

Assistant Professors: Natka Bianchini; Kerry Boeye

Affiliate Faculty: Letty Bonnell; Kevin Gift; Lisa Green-Cudek; Christopher Lonegan; Daniel R. McDavitt; Carol Miller-Frost; Lake Newton; Mary Skeen; Christopher Walker; Lars Westby

Theatre Manager: Stuart Dawkins


The Fine Arts Department offers a major, a minor, and an interdisciplinary major in art history, performing arts, and visual arts. Students interested in visual arts may pursue concentrations in photography or studio arts. Students interested in performing arts may pursue concentrations in music or theatre (within the area of fine arts). Internships are available throughout the department. Students seeking internships should contact a faculty director in the semester prior to the internship.

The department offers an optional senior project course for majors; this is the equivalent of an honors thesis in other humanities departments. Students interested in undertaking a senior project must consult with faculty in the appropriate discipline during their junior year to develop their proposed projects. Students present their proposals to the fine arts faculty for approval during the spring semester of their junior year, register for credit in the first semester of their senior year, and work on the project throughout both semesters of the senior year. The senior project culminates in an on- or off-campus exhibition, presentation, or performance. For additional information on senior projects, consult the link on the department's website.

It is possible to pursue some interdisciplinary majors within the department (i.e., art history and visual arts majors may be combined), and the department will allow departmentally-approved courses to double-count, so long as both department chairs agree. For more information on cross-listed courses, fine arts students should consult the department chair.

MAJOR IN ART HISTORY

Learning Aims

Students majoring in art history will demonstrate mastery in the following five areas:

  • Visual literacy demonstrated through formal and comparative analyses of works of art
  • Knowledge of the terminology, methodology and historiography of the discipline
  • Knowledge of the major artists, monuments, and artistic periods of Western art; familiarity with at least one non-Western tradition
  • The ability to conduct scholarly research, as demonstrated by responsible use of scholarly sources, both electronic and printed
  • The development of critical reading, writing, and thinking skills that enable the student to construct a complex contextual analysis of a work of art

Bachelor of Arts

Requirements for the major and an example of a typical program of courses are as follows:

Freshman Year

Fall Term

    AH110 Survey of Art: Paleolithic to Gothic
    WR100 Effective Writing
    Language Core
    Math/Science Core
    Elective

Spring Term

    AH111 Survey of Art: Renaissance to Modern
    EN101 Understanding Literature
    HS101 Europe and the World Since 1500
    Language Core or
    Elective
    Nondepartmental Elective

Sophomore Year

Fall Term

    AH200-Level Course (or higher)
    PL201 Foundations of Philosophy or
    TH201 Introduction to Theology
    English Core
    History Core
    Nondepartmental Elective

Spring Term

    AH200-Level Course (non-Western, diversity course)
    PL200-Level Philosophical Perspectives Course or
    Theology Core
    Math/Science Core
    Social Science Core
    Nondepartmental Elective

Junior Year

Fall Term

    AH300-Level Course (or higher)
    PT270 Basic Digital Photography or
    SA224 Two-Dimensional Design
    PL201 Foundations of Philosophy or
    TH201 Introduction to Theology
    Social Science Core
    Nondepartmental Elective

Spring Term

    AH300-Level Course (or higher)
    AH300-Level Course (or higher)
    PL200-Level Philosophical Perspectives Course or
    Theology Core
    Math/Science Core
    Elective

Senior Year

Fall Term

    AH300-Level Course (or higher)
    AH300-Level Course (or higher)
    Ethics Core
    Elective
    Elective

Spring Term

    AH300-Level Course (or higher)
    AH412 Senior Project in Art History or
    AH300-Level Course (or higher)
    Elective
    Elective
    Elective

* Terms may be interchanged.

  1. Art history majors take AH110, AH111, PT270 or SA224, and nine upper-division courses. Majors must take one 200-level, non-Western course (which fulfills the diversity core requirement); no more than two 200-level courses may count toward the major. Students must take one upper-division course in classical or medieval art, one in Renaissance or baroque art, and one in art postdating the eighteenth century.
  2. Interdisciplinary art history majors take AH110, AH111, and five upper-division courses (200-level or above). Students must take one upper-division course in classical or medieval art, one in Renaissance or baroque art, and one in art postdating the eighteenth century. Students are strongly encouraged to take a course in non-Western art to fulfill their diversity core requirement.
  3. Students must complete the diversity core requirement through a designated diversity core, major, or elective course (see Diversity Core Requirement under Curriculum and Policies).

MAJOR IN FINE ARTS

Music Concentration

Learning Aims

Students who elect a music concentration will demonstrate a mastery in the following five areas:

  • Aural literacy--defined as an ability to recognize the elements of musical language: pitch, rhythm, and harmony, and the ability to manipulate those elements in a coherent manner
  • Stylistic literacy--the ability to recognize, analyze, and understand the genesis of the major stylistic periods
  • Instrumental literacy--the ability to perform music in an expressive and stylistically appropriate manner at a reasonably advanced level
  • Ensemble ability--the ability to work cooperatively towards a musical/interpretive goal with other musician
  • Writing skills--the ability to write cogently about music
Bachelor of Arts

Requirements for the major and an example of a typical program of courses are as follows:

Freshman Year

Fall Term

    MU201 Music Fundamentals
    MU203 Mozart to Mahler: Music of the Classical and Romantic Periods
    MU205 Musicianship I
    MU211 Jazz Ensemble I or
    MU220 Chamber Ensemble I or
    MU227 Loyola Singers I or
    MU230 Classical Guitar Ensemble I or
    MU231 Steel Pan Ensemble I
    MU219 Applied Music (1 hour)
    WR100 Effective Writing
    Language Core
    Math/Science Core

Spring Term

    HS101 Europe and the World Since 1500
    MU206 Musicianship II
    MU211 Jazz Ensemble I or
    MU220 Chamber Ensemble I or
    MU227 Loyola Singers I or
    MU230 Classical Guitar Ensemble I or
    MU231 Steel Pan Ensemble I
    MU219 Applied Music (1 hour)
    MU302 Structure of Music: Theory I
    Language Core or
    Elective
    Math/Science Core

Sophomore Year

Fall Term

    EN101 Understanding Literature
    MU207 Musicianship III
    MU219 Applied Music (1 hour)
    MU310 Structure of Music: Theory II
    MU311 Jazz Ensemble II or
    MU320 Chamber Ensemble II or
    MU321 Loyola Singers II or
    MU330 Classical Guitar Ensemble II or
    MU331 Steel Pan Ensemble II
    PL201 Foundations of Philosophy
    TH201 Introduction to Theology or
    Math/Science Core

Spring Term

    MU208 Musicianship IV
    MU219 Applied Music (1 hour)
    MU300-Level Music History Course
    MU311 Jazz Ensemble II or
    MU320 Chamber Ensemble II or
    MU321 Loyola Singers II or
    MU330 Classical Guitar Ensemble II or
    MU331 Steel Pan Ensemble II
    PL200-Level Philosophical Perspectives Course
    History Core (300-Level)
    Social Science Core
    Theology Core

Junior Year

Fall Term

    MU311 Jazz Ensemble II or
    MU320 Chamber Ensemble II or
    MU321 Loyola Singers II or
    MU330 Classical Guitar Ensemble II or
    MU331 Steel Pan Ensemble II
    MU319 Applied Music (1 hour)
    TH201 Introduction to Theology
    English Core
    MU300-Level Elective
    Nondepartmental Elective
    Nondepartmental Elective

Spring Term

    MU300-Level Music History Course
    MU311 Jazz Ensemble II or
    MU320 Chamber Ensemble II or
    MU321 Loyola Singers II or
    MU330 Classical Guitar Ensemble II or
    MU331 Steel Pan Ensemble II
    MU319 Applied Music (1 hour)
    Upper-Level Music Course
    Theology Core
    Nondepartmental Elective
    Elective

Senior Year

Fall Term

    AH111 Survey or Art: Renaissance to Modern or
    DR260 Introduction to Dance or
    DR350 Acting I or
    ED428 The Teaching of Music
    MU311 Jazz Ensemble II or
    MU320 Chamber Ensemble II or
    MU321 Loyola Singers II or
    MU330 Classical Guitar Ensemble II or
    MU331 Steel Pan Ensemble II
    MU319 Applied Music (1 hour)
    Ethics Core
    MU300-Level Elective
    Elective
    Elective

Spring Term

    MU311 Jazz Ensemble II or
    MU320 Chamber Ensemble II or
    MU321 Loyola Singers II or
    MU330 Classical Guitar Ensemble II or
    MU331 Steel Pan Ensemble II
    MU319 Applied Music (1 hour)
    MU412 Senior Project in Music or
    Upper-Level Music Course
    Nondepartmental Elective
    Elective
    Elective
    Elective
  1. Music majors take MU201, MU203, MU302, MU310, and eight upper-division courses. Of the remaining eight courses, a minimum of three must be music history courses (MU301, MU303, MU306, MU306, MU307, or MU309), and one must be a theory course (MU324, MU325, or MU326).
  2. Music students choose a particular area of concentration: an instrument, voice, theory/composition, or music history. All students are admitted to upper-level applied and ensemble courses through the music jury process.
  3. Those concentrating on an instrument usually take one-hour lessons (MU219 or MU319). Those concentrating in theory, composition, or music history are required to take half-hour lessons at the minimum (MU218 or MU318). Students who enter the program after freshman year may be given credit for lower division applied music at the discretion of the department chair, usually after an audition. Students who wish to complete a degree in music education should consult with music faculty to discuss course requirements.

  4. Music majors must take a minimum of six additional courses in applied music (two lower- and four upper-division), six in ensembles (two lower- and four upper-division), and four semesters of Musicianship. After declaring the music major, students are required to enroll in an ensemble and an applied music course each semester they attend Loyola.
  5. The following courses are taken in addition to the regular five-course load since they are not three-credit courses: ear training (MU101, MU102, MU103, MU104; inactive); applied music (MU218, MU219, MU318, MU319); and ensembles (MU200–inactive, MU211, MU220, MU230, MU231, MU300–inactive, MU311, MU320, MU330, MU331). Students register for these courses during the regular registration period. Ensemble requirements are satisfied by taking Chamber Ensemble, Jazz Ensemble, Classical Guitar Ensemble, Steel Pan Ensemble, or Loyola Singers.
  6. A nonrefundable fee is charged for all Applied Music courses which is paid directly to the instructor at the first lesson. A semester jury is required of all applied music students beginning with their second semester of applied music study.

  7. Students who wish to enter Loyola as a fine arts major concentrating in music should submit a clearly marked audition CD or tape or call the department to arrange an audition.
  8. Students must complete the diversity core requirement through a designated diversity core, major, or elective course (see Diversity Core Requirement under Curriculum and Policies).

Theatre Concentration

Learning Aims

Students with a theatre concentration will demonstrate a mastery in the following areas:

  • An advanced literacy in the terminology, conventions, and collaborative methodology of theatre, including knowledge of theatre practice, as well as the methodology, historiography, and conventions of the theatre scholar
  • Historical, literary, and theoretical literacy defined as an ability to identify and recognize the major periods of theatre history from ancient Greek theatre to contemporary world theatre, and familiarity with wide array of performance styles and dramatic genres, as well as knowledge of the representative works and playwrights of each genre, major movements in dramatic theory, and representative discourses
  • A heightened aesthetic sensibility through participation in the interpretive creative process of live theatre in a variety of different capacities and critical reflection on the work of others, as well as a mastery of textual analysis utilizing plays as dynamic blueprints for theatrical action and cultural expression
  • Communication and information literacy, defined as the ability to conduct scholarly research in the discipline, including the use of scholarly sources and academic databases, the understanding of primary and secondary sources, and the ability to construct and sustain an argument supported by critical sources and communicate that argument to a defined audience via oral or written means
Bachelor of Arts

Requirements for the major and an example of a typical program of courses are as follows:

Freshman Year

Fall Term

    DR251  Experience of Theatre
    WR100 Effective Writing
    Language Core
    Math/Science Core
    Social Science Core

Spring Term

    DR100 Stagecraft
    EN101 Understanding Literature
    HS101 Europe and the World Since 1500
    Language Core or
    Elective
    Math/Science Core

Sophomore Year

Fall Term

    DR250 Introduction to Theatre History
    DR350 Acting I
    PL201 Foundations of Philosophy or
    TH201 Introduction to Theology
    English Core
    Math/Science Core

Spring Term

    DR270 Scene Design
    DR275 Theatre Practicum (#1)
    DR351 Directing I
    PL200-Level Philosophical Perspectives Course or
    Theology Core
    History Core
    Social Science Core

Junior Year

Fall Term

    DR275 Theatre Practicum (#2)
    Upper-Division Theatre Literature/History Course
    PL201 Foundations of Philosophy or
    TH201 Introduction to Theology
    Theatre Elective
    Nondepartmental Elective
    Elective

Spring Term

    DR354 Acting II
    Upper-Division Theatre Performance Course
    PL200-Level Philosophical Perspectives Course or
    Theology Core
    Theatre Elective
    Nondepartmental Elective

Senior Year

Fall Term

    DR275 Theatre Practicum (#3)
    Upper-Division Theatre Performance Course
    Theatre Elective
    Theatre Elective
    Elective
    Elective

Spring Term

    DR374 Theatre Production Internship
    Ethics Core
    Theatre Elective
    Nondepartmental Elective
    Elective
  1. Fine arts majors with a theatre concentration must take six required courses (DR100, DR250, DR251, DR350, DR351, DR374) and five theatre electives. They must also complete three one-credit hours of Theatre Practicum (DR275). No more than one of the following courses counts toward the major: DR260, DR261, DR263, DR278, DR279, DR280, DR281, DR282 (inactive).
  2. Interdisciplinary fine arts majors with a theatre concentration take five required courses (DR100, DR250, DR251, DR350, DR351, DR374), DR275/three times, and two theatre electives.
  3. Students must complete the diversity core requirement through a designated diversity core, major, or elective course (see Diversity Core Requirement under Curriculum and Policies).

MAJOR IN VISUAL ARTS

Photography Concentration

Learning Aims

Students with a photography concentration will demonstrate a mastery in the following five areas:

  • Technical command of the photographic medium. Students should be able to make confident, informed decisions regarding composition, exposure and print quality using both analog and digital technology.
  • Command of the skills necessary to evoke their personal visions.
  • Heightened visual sensibility. Students should learn to see both with their eyes and their cameras and make astute compositional decisions in their photographs.
  • Knowledge of the history of the photographic medium and how it relates to the history of the other fine arts.
  • Fluent knowledge of the vocabulary of photographic aesthetics. Through their photographs, critiques, and written evaluations, students should demonstrate an ability to articulate their intentions about their own work and criticisms about the work of others using objective terminology.
Bachelor of Arts

Requirements for the major and an example of a typical program of courses are as follows:

Freshman Year

Fall Term

    PT270 Basic Digital Photography
    PT319 History of Photography
    WR100 Effective Writing
    Language Core
    Math/Science Core

Spring Term

    EN101 Understanding Literature
    HS101 Europe and the World Since 1500
    PT375 Silver Processes
    SA224 Two-Dimensional Design
    Language Core or
    Elective

Sophomore Year

Fall Term

    PL201 Foundations of Philosophy or
    TH201 Introduction to Theology
    PT300-Level Course
    English Core
    History Core
    Art History Course

Spring Term

    PL200-Level Philosophical Perspectives Course or
    Theology Core
    PT300-Level Course
    Math/Science Core
    Social Science Core
    Nondepartmental Elective

Junior Year

Fall Term

    PL201 Foundations of Philosophy or
    TH201 Introduction to Theology
    Social Science Core
    Nondepartmental Elective
    Elective
    Elective

Spring Term

     PL200-Level Philosophical Perspectives Course or
    Theology Core
    PT300-Level Course (or higher)
    Math/Science Core
    Nondepartmental Elective
    Elective

Senior Year

Fall Term

    PT400 Professional Practices for Artists or
    PT412 Senior Project in Photography
    PT300-Level Course (or higher)
    PT300-Level Course (or higher)
    Ethics Core
    Nondepartmental Elective
    Elective

Spring Term

    PT300-Level Course (or higher)
    PT300-Level Course (or higher)
    Elective
    Elective
    Elective
  1. Visual arts majors with a photography concentration take AH111, PT270, PT319, PT375, PT400 or PT412, SA224, one additional art history course, and seven additional upper-division photography courses. No more than one of the following may count towards the major: PT278, PT279, PT280, PT281, PT282 (inactive).
  2. Interdisciplinary visual arts majors with a photography concentration take AH111, PT270, PT319, PT375, PT400 or PT412, and three additional upper-division photography courses.
  3. Visual arts students with a photography concentration are strongly encouraged to take computer science to fulfill one of the math/science core requirements.
  4. Students interested in photojournalism should declare a visual arts major with a photography concentration and a communication minor, or a communication major with a journalism specialization and a photography minor.
  5. Students must complete the diversity core requirement through a designated diversity core, major, or elective course (see Diversity Core Requirement under Curriculum and Policies).

Studio Arts Concentration

Learning Aims

Students with a studio arts concentration will demonstrate a mastery in the following areas:

  • Familiarity with the concepts and materials of the visual arts and the ability to communicate and analyze the significance of their own work and the works of others
  • Acquisition of technical skills in drawing, painting, printmaking, mixed media art, three-dimensional art, and digital technology
  • A mastery of the creative and manual skills required for solving two- and three-dimensional design problems
  • The ability to conduct a critical dialogue between personal work and the larger art historical tradition
  • A sound preparation for entering the professional work force or pursuing graduate study
Bachelor of Arts

Requirements for the major and an example of a typical program of courses are as follows:

Freshman Year

Fall Term

    AH111 Survey of Art: Renaissance to Modern
    SA224 Two-Dimensional Design
    WR100 Effective Writing
    Language Core
    Math/Science Core

Spring Term

    EN101 Understanding Literature
    HS101 Europe and the World Since 1500
    PT270 Basic Digital Photography
    SA225 Drawing
    Language Core or
    Elective

Sophomore Year

Fall Term

    PL201 Foundations of Philosophy
    SA300-Level Course (SA310-325)*
    TH201 Introduction to Theology
    English Core
    History Core

Spring Term

    PL200-Level Philosophical Perspectives Course
    SA352 Collage, Assemblage, and the Found Object* or
    SA353 Book Arts and Artists' Books or
    SA354 Mixed Media: Drawing and Painting
    Math/Science Core
    Social Science Core
    Theology Core

Junior Year

Fall Term

    SA303 Life Drawing* or
    SA304 Drawing with Color or
    SA342 Drawing from Observation or
    SA343 Drawing: A Conceptual Approach
    SA321 Printmaking: Relief and Intaglio* or
    SA322 Printmaking: Screenprint and Nontraditional Lithography or
    SA323 Printmaking: Alternative Processes
    Social Science Core
    Nondepartmental Elective
    Elective

Spring Term

    AH200-Level Course (or higher)
    SA365 Clay* or
    SA366 Three-Dimensional Design
    Math/Science Core
    Theology Core or
    Nondepartmental Elective

Senior Year

Fall Term

    SA360 Digital Mixed Media* or
    SA361 Digital Image
    SA400 Professional Practices for Artists or
    SA412 Senior Project in Studio Arts
    Ethics Core
    Nondepartmental Elective
    Elective

Spring Term

    SA300-Level Course
    SA300-Level Course
    Nondepartmental Elective
    Elective
    Elective

* Terms may be interchanged.

  1. Visual arts majors with a studio arts concentration take AH111, PT270, SA224, SA225, SA400 or SA412, one additional art history course (AH320 recommended), and nine additional studio arts courses. Of the nine additional studio arts courses, one must be taken from each of the following sequences: drawing (SA303-304, SA342-343), painting (SA310-315), printmaking (SA321-323), mixed media (SA352-355), digital (SA360-361), and three-dimensional (SA365-366). The three remaining courses may be selected from any SA300- or 400-level course.
  2. Visual arts interdisciplinary majors with a studio arts concentration take SA224, SA225, four additional upper-division studio arts courses, and one art history course.
  3. Students must complete the diversity core requirement through a designated diversity core, major, or elective course (see Diversity Core Requirement under Curriculum and Policies).

MINOR IN ART HISTORY

  • AH110 Survey of Art: Paleolithic to Gothic
  • AH111 Survey of Art: Renaissance to Modern
  • Four upper-division courses (200-level or higher)

Students are strongly encouraged to take a course in non-Western art, which fulfills the diversity requirement.

MINOR IN MUSIC

  • MU201 Music Fundamentals
  • MU203 Mozart to Mahler: Music of the Classical and Romantic Periods
  • MU302 Structure of Music: Theory I
  • Three upper-division courses
  • Four semesters of Applied Music (two lower- and two upper-division)
  • Ensembles (two lower- and two upper-division)
  • Two semesters of Musicianship

MINOR IN PHOTOGRAPHY

  • PT270 Basic Digital Photography
  • PT319 History of Photography or
  • One art history course
  • PT375 Silver Processes
  • Four additional upper-division photography courses

MINOR IN STUDIO ARTS

  • SA224 Two-Dimensional Design
  • SA225 Drawing
  • Four additional upper-division studio arts courses
  • One art history course

MINOR IN THEATRE

  • DR100 Stagecraft
  • DR250 Introduction to Theatre History
  • DR251 Experience of Theatre
  • DR275 Theatre Practicum (1 credit; taken three times)
  • DR350 Acting I
  • DR351 Directing I

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